The Senator; or, Clarendon's parliamentary chronicle

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Page 49 - ... becomes vacant hereafter in elected, the time of this present or any other parliament, shall or do hereafter, by himself or themselves, or by any other ways or means on his or their behalf...
Page 49 - ... county, city, town, borough, port or place, in general* or to or for the use, advantage, benefit, employment, profit, or preferment, of any such person or persons, place or places, in order to be elected, or for being elected, to serve in parlament for such county, city, borough, town, or place.
Page 540 - He, therefore, can add nothing to the afturances which he has already given to the minifter for foreign affairs, as well by word of mouth, as in his official note...
Page 521 - ... had been laid down by them as the principle on which they had always offered to treat. His Grace then proceeded to animadvert on the converfation between Lord Malmefbury and M. Delacroix, and inferred, that...
Page 48 - ... election be made and declared, make any other prefent, gift, or reward, or any promife, obligation, or engagement to do the...
Page 46 - Becaufe the inability of humbling ourfelves again to folicit peace in a manner, which is a recognition of the French...
Page 409 - ... and that the men are in their graves, and cannot be brought to life again. Poor Collot ! He is not the better for being in Guiana : what is the use of it ? Let us send for him and bring him home. How can men of feeling think of prolonging the punishment of poor Collot d'Herbois?
Page 74 - England ; at least, since parliaments had any credit for attending to the interests of the people. To hold it up, therefore, as an object of imitation, is enough to confound any man who feels for the principles of freedom; — a parliament which has done more to destroy every thing that is dear to us, than in better days would have entered into the mind of any Englishman to attempt, or even to conceive.
Page 47 - Carthage," they accufe us of national perfidy, and hold England up, as an object to be blotted out from the face of the earth.
Page 49 - ... at any time hereafter, make any promise, agreement, obligation or engagement to give or allow any money, meat, drink, provision, present, reward, or entertainment, to or for any...

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