The King Alfred Millenary: A Record of the Proceedings of the National Commemoration

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1902 - 212 pages
 

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Page 190 - If thou shouldst never see my face again, Pray for my soul. More things are wrought by prayer Than this world dreams of. Wherefore, let thy voice Rise like a fountain for me night and day. For what are men better than sheep or goats...
Page 110 - ... any craft, without wisdom. Because whatsoever is done through folly, no one can ever reckon for craft. This is now especially to be said ; that I wished to live honourably whilst I lived, and after my life to leave to the men who were after me, my memory in good works.
Page 8 - And indeed He seems to me Scarce other than my own ideal knight, " Who reverenced his conscience as his king ; Whose glory was, redressing human wrong ; Who spake no slander, no, nor listen'd to it ; Who loved one only and who clave to her...
Page 161 - Alfred's character. His temper was instinct with piety. Everywhere throughout his writings that remain to us the name of God, the thought of God, stir him to outbursts of ecstatic adoration. But he was no mere saint. He felt none of that scorn of the world about him which drove the nobler souls of his day to monastery or hermitage. Vexed as he was by sickness and constant pain, his temper took no touch of asceticism. His rare geniality, a peculiar elasticity and mobility of nature, gave color and...
Page 15 - LOVE thou thy land, with love far-brought From out the storied Past, and used Within the Present, but transfused Thro' future time by power of thought.
Page 34 - A saint without superstition, a scholar without ostentation, a warrior all whose wars were fought in the defense of his country, a conqueror whose laurels were never stained by cruelty, a prince never cast down by adversity, never lifted up to insolence in the day of triumph — there is no other name in history to compare with his.
Page 96 - WILL BEAR, SWIFTNESS IN ERRAND THE STAG'S FEET DECLARE : LOADED HIS LEFT HAND APT TO LABOUR SAITH : THE VEST HIS NEATNESS, OPEN HAND HIS FAITH. GIRT WITH HIS SWORD, HIS SHIELD UPON HIS ARM, HIMSELF AND MASTER...
Page 33 - He hath not beheld iniquity in Jacob, neither hath He seen perverseness in Israel: the Lord his God is with him, and the shout of a king is among them.
Page 109 - ... only be an effigy of the imagination, and so the Alfred we reverence may well be an idealised figure. For our real knowledge of him is scanty and vague. We have, however, draped round his form, not without reason, all the highest attributes of manhood and kingship. The Arthur of our poets, the paladin king, without fear, without stain, and without reproach, is to us the true representation of Alfred. In him, indeed, we venerate not so much a striking actor in our history as the ideal Englishman,...
Page 41 - King Alfred bids greet Bishop Wasrferth with loving words and with friendship ; and I let it be known to thee that it has very often come into my mind what wise men there...

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