The Spectator, Volume 7

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J. and R. Tonson and S. Draper, 1753 - English essays
 

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Page 70 - They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths : their soul is melted because of trouble : they reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and are at their wit's end.
Page 24 - ... reason of its rarity, that if I meet with any one in a field which pleases me, I give it a place in my garden. By this means, when a stranger walks with me, he is...
Page 103 - MY friend Will Honeycomb has told me, for above this half year, that he had a great mind to try his hand at a Spectator, and that he would fain have one of his writing in my works. This morning I received from him the following letter, which, after having rectified some little orthographical mistakes, I shall make a present of to the public. ' DEAR SPEC. ' I WAS about two nights ago in company with very agreeable young people of both sexes, where, talking of some of your papers which...
Page 175 - Knowing that you was my old Master's good Friend, I could not forbear sending you the melancholy News of his Death, which has afflicted the whole Country, as well as his poor Servants, who loved him, I may say, better than we did our Lives. I am afraid he caught his Death the last County...
Page 26 - The laurel, the horn-beam, and the holly, with many other trees and plants of the same nature, grow so thick in it that you cannot imagine a more lively scene. The glowing redness of the berries, with which they are hung at this time, vies with the verdure of their leaves, .and...
Page 209 - As I remember the great affection which was between you and your excellent brother, and know you love his daughter as your own, so as not only to express the tenderness of the best of aunts, but even to supply that of the best of fathers ; I am sure it will be a...
Page 94 - The young man did not want natural talents; but the father of him was a coxcomb, who affected being a fine gentleman so unmercifully, that he could not endure in his sight, or the frequent mention of one who was his son, growing into .manhood, and thrusting him out of the gay world.
Page 111 - These are thoughts which I had, when I fell into a kind of vision upon this subject, and may therefore stand for a proper introduction to a relation of it.
Page 63 - Thus it is observed, that men sometimes, upon the hour of their departure, do speak and reason above themselves; for then the soul, beginning to be freed from the ligaments of the body, begins to reason like herself, and to discourse in a strain above mortality.
Page 185 - There are animals so near of kin both to birds and beasts, that they are in the middle between both : amphibious animals link...

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