The odes of Horace, tr. into Engl. verse, with a life and notes, by T. Martin

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Page 281 - La mort a des rigueurs à nulle autre pareilles ; On a beau la prier, La cruelle qu'elle est se bouche les oreilles, Et nous laisse crier. Le pauvre en sa cabane, où le chaume le couvre, Est sujet à ses lois ; Et la garde qui veille aux barrières du Louvre N'en défend point nos Rois. De murmurer contre elle et perdre patience II est mal à propos ; Vouloir ce que Dieu veut est la seule science Qui nous met en repos.
Page 338 - Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call to-day his own : He who, secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived today. Be fair or foul, or rain or shine, The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate, are mine. Not Heaven itself upon the past has power ; But what has been, has been, and I have had my hour.
Page 302 - A shadow flits before me, Not thou, but like to thee; Ah Christ, that it were possible For one short hour to see The souls we loved, that they might tell us What and where they be.
Page 330 - How often have I stole forth in the coldest night in January, and found him in the garden, stuck like a dripping statue! There would he kneel to me in the snow, and sneeze and cough so pathetically! he shivering with cold, and I with apprehension! and while the freezing blast numbed our joints, how warmly would he press me to pity his flame, and glow with mutual ardour! Ah, Julia, that was something like being in love!
Page 3 - Blessings be with them — and eternal praise. Who gave us nobler loves and nobler cares — The poets, who on earth have made us heirs Of truth and pure delight by heavenly lays ! Oh-!
Page 281 - Mais elle était du monde, où les plus belles choses Ont le pire destin, Et rosé elle a vécu ce que vivent les rosés, L'espace d'un matin.
Page 336 - Give strong drink unto him that is ready to perish, and wine unto those that be of heavy hearts. Let him drink and forget his poverty and remember his misery no more.
Page 9 - Cheer'd by the simple song and soaring lark. Meanwhile incumbent o'er the shining share The master leans, removes the obstructing clay, Winds the whole work, and sidelong lays the glebe.
Page 97 - Others more mild, Retreated in a silent valley, sing With notes angelical to many a harp Their own heroic deeds and hapless fall By doom of battle ; and complain that fate Free virtue should enthral to force or chance.
Page 374 - ON THE STUDY OF WORDS. Lectures Addressed (originally) to the Pupils at the Diocesan Training School, Winchester.

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