Professional excursions, by an auctioneer [W. Simpson].

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Page 157 - DAY set on Norham's castled steep. And Tweed's fair river, broad and deep. And Cheviot's mountains lone : The battled towers, the donjon keep, The loop-hole grates where captives weep. The flanking walls that round it sweep, In yellow lustre shone.
Page 227 - suggested the following experiment : a hog nearly of the same size as the seven, but who had not been put up with them, because they appeared to be rather larger, but without weighing them, was confined on the 4th of March, in a cage made of planks, of which one side was made to move with pegs, so as to fit exactly the size of the hog, with small holes at the bottom for the water to drain from him, and a door behind to remove the soil. The cage stood upon four feet, about...
Page 312 - The produce of these wells is said to be an impregnation of rain in some of the neighbouring eminences, which abound in iron mineral, where it is further enriched with the marine salts, and all the valuable ingredients constituting it a light and pure chalybeate, which...
Page 227 - Egfemont has tried a great variety of nogs, and made many experiments, to determine the most profitable food, which is barley ; the white hog for store and grazing, is the best he has yet tried. They are killed after summer grazing in the park ; and it is a most advantageous method : no corn is given : nothing but grass. They are turned out in May, and in October and November brought to the slaughter-house, and die good porkers. Tkjs is a curious experiment, and deserves further trial. In this experiment...
Page 228 - This is a most singular result, and as the hog thus confined was so much superior to all the others, though not equally fed, it can scarcely arise from any other circnaaMan--' but the method adopted: it is extereaily curious, and deserves to be farther examined in a variety of trials.
Page 227 - Some days after, the observation of a particular circumstance" (?) " suggested the following experiment : a hog nearly of the same size as the seven, but who had not been put up with them, because they appeared to be rather larger, but without weighing them, was confined on the 4th of March, in a cage made of planks, of which one side was made to move with pegs, so as to fit exactly the size of the hog, with small holes at the bottom for the water to...
Page 227 - In this experiment the hogs ranged over an extensive park. In another trial made, they were confined in a cage, exactly fitted to the size of the animal, which was augmented as the hog grew larger ; and no more space allowed him, than what was sufficient for him to lie down upon his belly.
Page xxii - ... .at the sad catastrophe. Such, however, were its short and painful annals ; and, except the grotto, not one stone now remains upon another. The palace, destined to stand for ages, and on which time had made no inroads, was removed, with the approbation of the Lord Chancellor, when little more than a hundred winters had passed over it : when its features were just mellowed, its woods and plantations in full luxuriance, and all around it smiling in perfection. Wanstead House was the most attractive...
Page xxi - In the latter part of the eighteenth century,'' writes the author of " Provincial Excursions " in 1843, "Wanstead House still displayed all the splendour which the Childs, the Tylneys, and the Longs, had lavished upon a palace fit for the abode of gentle and royal blood. Little did I dream that in one quarter of a century I should see its proud columns prostrate in the dust, its decorations annihilated, its pictures and sculptures dispersed by the magic of the hammer ; at one period simply a deserted...
Page 1 - with every little bower and secluded avenue ; I knew where its blossoms were fairest and the fruits choicest ; could thread the mazes of its delightful foliage and exotic gardens, its limpid waters, and its verdant lawns, all which I have visited at dawn and at sunset, in midday and at night.

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