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'Twas 1 ́s ́

That ha'ith a.

And to At the w

The way into these weeping ep

Vain loues aunt! El Lan is for' ear!

The Lamb hath dipp't. His white foot hote.

XX.

And now where'ere He strayes,

Among the Galilean mountaines,

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Or more vnwellcome wayes;

He's follow'd by two faithfull fountaines; Two walking baths, two weeping motions, Portable, and compendious oceans.

ΧΧΙ.

O thou, thy Lord's fair store!
In thy so rich and rare expenses,
Euen when He show'd most poor

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He might prouoke the wealth of princes.

What prince's wanton'st pride e'er could

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Wash with syluer, wipe with gold?

XXII.

Who is that King, but He

Who calls 't His crown, to be call'd thine,

That thus can boast to be

Waited on by a wandring mine,

A voluntary mint, that strowes

Warm, syluer showres wher're He goes?

XXIII.

O pretious prodigall!

Fair spend-thrift of thy-self! thy measure

(Mercilesse loue !) is all.

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Euen to the last pearle in thy threasure: thesaurus,

All places, times, and obiects be

Thy teares' sweet opportunity.

VOL. I.

C

[Latin.

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The sands He us'd, no longer please,

For His owne sands Hee'l use thy seas.

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Thus must we date thy memory.

Others by moments, months, and yeares
Measure their ages; thou, by teares.

XXIX.

So doe perfumes expire,

So sigh tormented sweets, opprest

With proud vnpittying fire.

Such teares the suffring rose, that's vext

With vngentle flames, does shed,

Sweating in a too warm bed.

XXX.

Say, ye bright brothers,

The fugitive sons of those fair eyes,

Your fruitfull mothers!

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What make you here what hopes can 'tice

You to be born! what one can borrow

You from those neata of noble worrow!

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The fortune of interior gemmes,
Pretend to some proud face.

Or perteh't vpon feud di dens:

Crown'd heads are toys. We go to meet

A worthy object, ur Lord's feet.

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NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS.

With some shortcoming-superficial rather than substantive The Weeper' is a lovely poem, and well deserves its place of honour at the commencement of the Steps to the Temple, as in editions of 1616, 1618, and 1670. Accordingly we have spent the utmost pains on our text of it, taking for basis that of 1652. The various readings of the different editions and of the SANCROFT MS, are given below for the capable student of the ultimate perfected form. I have not hesitated

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