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Line 21, I follow here the text of 1648. 1652 reads

• Thine was the rosy dawn that sprung the day.' and this is repeated in 1670 and, of course, by TURNBULL. Line 26, 1648 has ‘your' for their.'

35 is inadvertently dropped in our text (1652), though the succeeding line (with which it rhymes) appears. I restore it. 1670 also drops it; and so again TURNBULL!

Lines 43-44, 'Because some foolish fly.' This metaphorical allusion to the Fall and its results (as described by MILTON and others) is founded on the dying of various insects after begetting their kind. G.

HOPE1

I

5

HOPE, whose weak beeing ruin'd is
Alike if it succeed or if it misse!
Whom ill and good doth equally confound,
And both the hornes of Fate's dilemma wound.

Vain shadow; that dost vanish quite

Both at full noon and perfect night! The starres haue not a possibility

Of blessing thee. If thinges then from their end we happy call, 'Tis Hope is the most hopelesse thing of all.

IO

Hope, thou bold taster of delight !
Who in stead of doing so, deuourst it quite.

Appeared first in 'Steps' of 1646 (pp. 96-9): reprinted in 1648 (pp. 111-113), 1652 (pp. 128-131), and 1670 (pp. 74-77). Our text is that of 1652, as before ; with the exception of better readings from 1646, as noted below. See our Memorial Introduction and Essay for notices of the friendship of Cowley and Crashaw. G.

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Line 21, I follow here the text of 1648. 1652 reads

* Thine was the rosy dawn that sprung the day.' and this is repeated in 1670 and, of course, by TURNBULL. Line 26, 1648 has ' your' for their.'

35 is inadvertently dropped in our text (1652), though the succeeding line (with which it rhymes) appears. I restore it. 1670 also drops it; and so again TURNBULL!

Lines 43-44, 'Because some foolish fly.' This metaphorical allusion to the Fall and its results (as described by Milton and others) is founded on the dying of various insects after begetting their kind. G.

HOPE.1

1

5

HOPE, whose weak beeing ruin'd is
Alike if it succeed or if it misse!
Whom ill and good doth equally confound,
And both the hornes of Fate's dilemma wound.

Vain shadow; that dost vanish quite

Both at full noon and perfect night! The starres haue not a possibility

Of blessing thee. If thinges then from their end we happy call, 'Tis Hope is the most hopelesse thing of all.

IO

Hope, thou bold taster of delight!
Who in stead of doing so, deuourst it quite.

Appeared first in “Steps' of 1646 (pp. 96.9): reprinted in 1648 (pp. 111-113), 1652 (pp. 128-131), and 1670 (pp. 74-77). Our text is that of 1652, as before ; with the exception of better readings from 1646, as noted below. See our Memorial Introduction and Essay for notices of the friendship of Cowley and Crashaw. G.

And th' other chases woman ; while she goes
More wayes and turnes then hunted Nature knowes. 40

M. COWLEY.

NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS. In all the editions save that of 1652 the respective portions of Cowley and Crashaw are alternated as Question and Answer, after a fashion of the day exemplified by PEMBROKE and RunYARD and others. The heading in 1646, 1648 and 1670 accordingly is . On Hope, by way of Question and Answer, between A. COWLEY and R. CRASHAW.'

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6

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l'arious readings from 1646 edition. Line 3, 'and' for or,' and · doth' for does.'

7, Fates' for starres :' but as Fate occurs in line 4, * starres' seems preferable. Line 9, 'ends' for 'end.'

18, 'so' for such.'
19, . doth' for · does;' adopted.
20, 'its' for · his;' the personification warrants his.'
25. All the other editions misread

* Thine empty c!ond, the eye it selfe deceives.' There can be no question that thinne' not thine' was the poet's word. Cf. CRASHAW's reference in his Answer. TurnBULL perpetuates the error. Line 30, 'not' for 'for.'

33, shield' in all the editions save 1652 by mistake.

34, · blows' and · chymicks' for • chymick;' the latter adopted. Line 37, as in line 19.

38, spelled • laborinths.' In our Essay see critical remarks showing that Cowley and CRAShaw revised their respective portions. It seems to have escaped notice that Cowley himself wrote another poem • For Hope,' as his former was · Against Hope.' See it in our Study of Crashaw's Life and Poetry. G.

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VOL. I.

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