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LXIII.

A thousand prophecies that talke strange things
lIad sowne of old these doubts in his deepe brest.
And now of late came tributary kings,
Bringing him nothing but new feares from th' East,
More deepe suspicions, and more deadly stings,
With which his feay’rous cares their cold increast.

And now bis dream (Hel's fireband) still more bright,
Shew'd him his feares, and kill’d him with the sight.

LXIV.

No sooner therefore shall the Morning see
(Night hangs yet heavy on the lids of Day)
But all the counsellours must summon'd bee,
To meet their troubled lord : without delay
Heralds and messengers immediately
Are sent about, who poasting every way

To th' heads and officers of every band,
Declare who sends, and what is his command.

LXV.

Why art thou troubled, Herod ? what vaine feare
Thy blood-revolving brest to rage doth move?
Heaven's King, Who doffs Himselfe weak flesh to weare,
Comes not to rule in wrath, but serve in love.
Nor would He this thy fear'd crown from thee teare,
But give thee a better with Himselfe above.

Poor jealousie! why should He wish to prey
V pon thy crowne, Who gives His owne away?

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inpagn.' Free 1670) is correct ***ing ilade' fur the mixprint made of 1646 and 1615. Tur rains is literails in 01004.

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St. lix. line 3. . 1 Decia. Tuom: 50 SHAKESPEARE (Ant. and Cleopatra, 7. 3, the presiy vorm and the worm.'

St. k. Every one will be reminded of the tent-scene in

Richari III.

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At end of this runniatiua PEREGRINE Phillips adds 'cetera destint-ben! Den

Marrs, aniCk12.t hate ieft proper names in the poem on: annotated. The ancestrite; but these may be noticed : st. kliü. L. L. Erre tee ril. Met. viii. 814 &c.); he offended Ceres

, and T28 57 sezoni shed with continual hunger, so that he devouri baris: line 5, Tantalus the fabled son of Zeus ani Pia. Tissecome in the lower world,' has been cele brated from her 01. 11.5*2 onward: ib. Atrens, grandson of Tarta z mased in infamy with his brother Thyestes: ib. Prome Prote, te of Terens, who was metamorphosed into & ** duod ii. 14, 81: 1.6, Lycaon, like Tantalus, with his asi Zens into wolves (Orid; Paus. viii. 3, § 1): s. 1 2. Mada, most famous of the mythical sorcerers : ib. deze 2 Kings ix. 10,36: line 3, Circe, another mythical BORETTO*: xia, danghter of Typho and rival of Circe, who transders ber Orid, Met. xiv. 1-74); cf. Paradise Lost: Ene 1. the Parede = the Fates, ever spinning: st. xliv. lines 7-8, all je bonsters: st. xlv. line i, Diomed's horses' faund" ILates' fed on human flesh (Apollod. č. 5, $ 8): • PheTELE" dupa or Fereas of mythical celebrity: line 2, Therodamas or Theronedon, king of Scythia, who fed lions with human toward Orid Iris 385, Pont. i. 2, 121): line 3, Busiris, associuted with O-iris of Egypt; but Herodotus denies that the Egyp

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can never climb the North or reach the zenith, being conquered by the effulgence of the sun of day. When did the fable of the angel Lucifer, founded on an astronomical appearance, mingle itself as it has done here, and grandly in Milton, and in the popular mind generally, with the biblical history of Satan?

St. xxxvi. line 2. Turnbull perpetuates the misprint of • whose' for.my' from 1670.

St. li. line 3, linage'=' lineage.' For once 1670 is correct in reading ‘linage for the misprint 'image' of 1646 and 1648. The original is literally as follows:

Herod the liege of Augustus, a man now agèd,
Then ruled over the royal courts of David :

Not of the royal line ....
St. lix. line 3, . a special worm:' so SHAKESPEARE (Ant. and
Cleopatra, v. 2), “the pretty worm' and the worm.'

St. lx. Every one will be reminded of the tent-scene in Richard III.

At end of this translation PEREGRINE PHILLIPS adds .cetera desunt-heu ! heu !'

Marino and CRASHAW have left proper names in the poem unannotated. They are mostly trite; but these may be noticed : st. xlii. I. 4, Erisichton (see Ovid, Met. viii. 814 &c.); he offended Ceres, and was by her punished with continual hunger, so that he devoured his own limbs: line 5, Tantalus the fabled son of Zeus and Pluto, whose doom in the lower world,' has been celebrated from Homer (Od. xi. 582) onward: ib. Atreus, grandson of Tantalus, immortalised in infamy with his brother Thyestes: ib. Progne=Procne, wife of Tereus, who was metamorphosed into a swallow (Apollod. iii. 14, 8): 1. 6, Lycaon, like Tantalus, with his sons changed by Zeus into wolves (Ovid; Paus. viii. 3, § 1): st. xliii. line 2, Medea, most famous of the mythical sorcerers : ib. Jezebel, 2 Kings ix. 10, 36: line 3, Circe, another mythical sorceress: Scylla, daughter of Typho and rival of Circe, who transformed her (Ovid, Met. xiv. 1-74); cf. Paradise Lost: line 4, the Parca=the Fates, ever spinning: st. xliv. lines 7-8, all classic monsters: st. xlv. line 1, · Diomed's horses'=the fabled 'mares' fed on human flesh (Apollod. ii. 5, § 8): Phereus' dogs,' or Fereus of mythical celebrity : line 2, Therodamas or Theromedon, king of Scythia, who fed lions with human blood (Ovid, Ibis 385, Pont. i. 2, 121): line 3, Busiris, associated with Osiris of Egypt; but Herodotus denies that the Egyp

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