How we are governed: or, The Crown, the senate and the bench. by Fonblanque and Holdsworth, revised to present date and enlarged by A.C. Ewald

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Alexander Charles Ewald
1869
 

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Page 13 - That levying money for or to the use of the crown, by pretence of prerogative, without grant of parliament, for longer time, or in other manner, than the same is or shall be granted, is illegal.
Page 14 - That the freedom of speech and debates or proceedings in parliament ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of parliament.
Page 29 - ... for the unexpired residue, whatever it may be, of any term originally created for a period of not less than...
Page 20 - Provided, that such of the said descendants as are above the age of twenty-five may, after a twelve-month's notice given to the king's privy council, contract and solemnize marriage without the consent of the crown; unless both houses of parliament shall, before the expiration of the said year, expressly declare their disapprobation of such intended marriage.
Page 29 - Every man shall be entitled to be registered as a voter, and, when registered, to vote for a member or members to serve in Parliament for a borough, who is qualified as follows...
Page 14 - That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted; 11. That jurors ought to be duly impanelled and returned, and jurors which pass upon men in trials for high treason ought to be freeholders; 12. That all grants and promises of fines and forfeitures of particular persons before conviction are illegal and void; 13.
Page 15 - But to punish (as the law does at present) any dangerous or offensive writings, which, when published, shall on a fair and impartial trial be adjudged of a pernicious tendency, is necessary for the preservation of peace and good order, of government and religion, the only solid foundations of civil liberty.
Page 12 - ... the Lord Chancellor or any of the judges in vacation, upon viewing a copy of the warrant, or affidavit that a copy is denied, shall (unless the party has neglected for two terms to apply to any court for his enlargement) award a habeas corpus for such prisoner, returnable immediately before himself or any other of the judges...
Page 13 - That the pretended power of dispensing with laws, or the execution of laws by regal authority, as it hath been assumed and exercised of late, is illegal. 3. That the commission for erecting the late Court of Commissioners for Ecclesiastical causes, and all other commissions and courts of like nature, are illegal and pernicious.
Page 13 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.

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