Historical and Descriptive Account of British India, from the Most Remote Period to the Present Time: Including a Narrative of the Early Portuguese and English Voyages, the Revolutions in the Mogul Empire, and the ... Establishment of the British Power; with Illustrations of the Zoology, Botany, Climate, Geology, and Mineralogy. Also Medical Observations,-an Account of the Hindoo Astronomy-the Trigonometrical Surveys,-and the Navigation of the Indian Seas, Volume 2

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Page 215 - Let us adore the supremacy of that divine sun, the god-head who illuminates all, who recreates all, from whom all proceed, to whom all must return, whom we invoke to direct our understandings aright in our progress towards his holy seat.
Page 164 - He is described as deeply sensible to the kindness of Lake, on whom he bestowed several titles, such as " the sword of the state, the hero of the land, the lord of the age, and the victorious in war.
Page 93 - ... but above all the total absence of every symptom of order, or obedience, or command, excepting groups collected round their respective flags ; every individual an independent warrior, self-impelled, affecting to be the champion whose single arm was to achieve victory ; scampering among each other in wild confusion.
Page 218 - It is inconceivable, and not to be encompassed by sinful man; and it is guarded by dreadful serpents. Many celestial medicinal plants adorn its sides; and it stands, piercing the heaven with its aspiring summit, a mighty hill, inaccessible even by the human mind.
Page 248 - Narrative, &c. vol. iii. p. 261. they are sober, industrious, affectionate to their relations ; generally speaking faithful to their masters, easily attached by kindness and confidence, and in the case of the military oath, are of admirable obedience, courage, and fidelity in life and death. But their morality does not extend beyond the reach of positive obligations ; and where these do not exist, they are oppressive, cruel, treacherous, and every thing that is bad.
Page 287 - By this bill a board of control was erected, consisting of six members of the privy council, who were "to check, superintend and control all acts, operations and concerns which in anywise relate to the civil or military government or revenues of the territories and possessions of the East India company.
Page 18 - ... 146 in number, were compelled to enter; and on their venturing to remonstrate, the commander ordered every one who should hesitate to be instantly cut down. Thus were they forcibly thrust into this fearful dungeon, into which the whole number could with difficulty be squeezed ; and the door was then fast barred from without. Their first impression, on finding themselves thus immured, was the utter impossibility of surviving one night, and the necessity of extricating themselves at whatever cost....
Page 47 - Retiring to the city of Mysore, only nine miles distant from the capital, he recruited his forces with the utmost diligence. A demand was hereupon made that he should discharge his troops, remove to a greater distance, and be content with a fixed allowance for his private expenses. He indignantly wrote in answer to Hyder : — " I have made you what you are, and now you refuse me a place in which to hide my head. Do what you please, or what you can. I move not from Mysore.
Page 118 - at our last stage, what is your determination ? "
Page 125 - U'Deen, who, on a former occasion, I had seen delivered up, with his brother, hostages to Marquis Cornwallis, the sad reverse of their fortunes, their fear, which, notwithstanding their struggles to conceal, was but too evident, excited the strongest emotions of compassion in my mind. I took Moize U'Deen (to whom the killedar, &c., principally directed their attention) by the hand, and endeavoured, by every mode in my power, to remove his fears...