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634

SIDNEY DOBELL (1824-1874)

WILLIAM MORRIS (1834-1896)

America....

591 The Earthly Paradise

MATTHEW ARNOLD (1822–1888)

Proem..

Culture and Anarchy : Sweetness and

Prologue.

Light'. .

591

The Lady of the Land.

Shakespeare..

602 ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE (1837–

The Forsaken Merman.

602

1909)

To Marguerite.

603 Chorus from Atalanta in Calydon. 640

Morality

604 The Garden of Proserpine.

641

* The Future.

Itylus....

642

Sohrab and Rustum.

605

Étude Réaliste (I, II, III).

Philomela ...

616 The Salt of the Earth..

643

The Scholar Gipsy.

617 Sonnets

The Last Word.

620

On Lamb's Specimens of Dramatic

EDWARD FITZGERALD (1809-1883)

Poets...

644

The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam... 621

Hope and Fear..

644

COVENTRY PATMORE (1823-1896)

After Sunset.

644

The Angel in the House : Preludes

GEORGE MEREDITH (1828-1909)

Bk. I, Canto III: I. The Lover ... 623 Love in the Valley.

644

Bk. I, Canto VIII: I. Life of Life 623 Juggling Jerry.

648

II. The Revelation.

624

Bellerophon.

649

III. The Spirit's Epochs.

Lucifer in Starlight.

650

The Unknown Eros : The Toys.

624

Ask, is love divine.

650

DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI (1828–1882)

Song of the Songless.

650

The Blessed Damozel..

Dirge in Woods...

650

Sister Helen ..

626 CHRISTINA ROSSETTI (1830–1894)

The Ballad of Dead Ladies, from

The Prince's Progress : The Bride-Song 650

François Villon..

629 A Birthday..

651

*Francesca da Rimini, from Dante. 629 Song : When I am dead.

651

On Refusal of Aid between Nations. 630

The First Day.

651

The Sonnet..

Remember.

652

Love-Sight.

630 Rest..

652

Love-Sweetness.

630 The Lowest Place..

652

Mid-Rapture.

631 JAMES THOMSON (1834–1882)

Soul-Light..

631 The City of Dreadful Night..

652

Known in Vain.

631 Sunday up the River..

The Landmark.

631 Art.

654

The Choice..

632 WALTER PATER (1839-1894)

Vain Virtues.

632 Style'.

654

Lost Days...

633

The Child in the House.

657

A Superscription.

633 ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON (1850-1894)

The One Hope.

633

François Villon..

662

NOTES.....

INDEX OF AUTHORS...

INDEX OF TITLES AND FIRST LINES..

781

783

ENGLISH PROSE

PROSE AND POETRY

EARLY MIDDLE ENGLISH

THE ANGLO-SAXON CHRONICLE (c. 1154)

A MONK OF PETERBOROUGH

FROM THE RECORD FOR 1137

3

5

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This gære 1 for 2 the king Stephne ofer sæ This year went King Stephen over the sea to Normandi, and ther wes 4 underfangen, to Normandy and was received there, befor-thi-that 6 hi ? uuenden 8 that he sculde 9 cause they thought that he was going to ben 10 alsuic 11 alse 12 the eom 13 wes, and for 6 be just such as his uncle was, and because he hadde get 14 his tresor; ac 15 he to-deld 16 it he still had his uncle's treasure; but he disand scatered sotlice.17 Micel 18 hadde Henri persed it and scattered it foolishly. Much king gadered gold and sylver, and na 19 god 20 had Henry the king gathered of gold and ne dide me 21 for his saule 22 tharof.23

silver, and no good did anyone for his soul by

means of it. Tha 24 the king Stephne to Englalande When King Stephen came to England, then com,25 tha 26 macod 27 he his gadering 28 æt he made his assembly at Oxford; and there Oxeneford; and thar he nam 29 the biscop he seized the bishop Roger of Salisbury and Roger of Sereberi,30 and Alexander biscop of Alexander, bishop of Lincoln, and the ChanLincol and te 31 Canceler Roger his neves,32 cellor Roger, his nephews, and put them all and dide 33 ælle in prisun til hi ? iafen up in prison till they gave up their castles. here 35 castles. Tha 24 the suikes 36 under When the traitors perceived that he was a gæton 37 that he milde man was and softe and mild man and soft and good, and enforced no god 20 and na 19 justise 38 ne dide, tha 26 diden justice, then did they all wonders. They hi 7 alle wunder.39 Hi 7 hadden him 40 had done homage to him and sworn oaths. red 41 maked 27 and athes 42

but they kept no troth. But they were all hi nan 19 treuthe ne heolden." Alle he ? forsworn and their troths were entirely wäron 45 forsworen, and here 35 treothes for abandoned; for every powerful man built loren; 46 for ævric 47 rice 48 man his castles "his castles and held against him, and they makede 49 and agænes 50 him heolden, 51 and filled the land full of castles. They opfylden 52 the land ful of castles. Hi suencten 53 pressed grievously the wretched men of the suythe 54 the uurecce 55 men of the land mid 56 land with castle-building. castel weorces.57

Tha 24 the castles uuaren 45 maked, tha 58 When the castles were built, then they fylden hi mid deovles and yvele 59

filled them with devils and evil men. Then Tha 58 namen 60 hi tha 61 men the 62 hi wenden 63 they seized the men who they thought had that ani god 64 hefden, 65 bathe 66 be 67 nihtes any property, both by night and by day,

1 year ? went 3 sea 4 was 5 received because 35 their 36 traitors 37 perceived 38 justice, punishthey 8 weened, thought should 10 be 11 just such ment

strange things, evils 40

homage 12 as 13 uncle 14 yet 15 but 16 dispersed 17 foolishly

42 oaths 43

sworn 44 kept 46 entirely aban18 much 19 no 20 good 21 anyone 22 soul 23 on account doned 47 every 48 powerful 49 built 50 against 51 held of it 24 when 25 came then 27 made 28 assembly 52 filled 53 oppressed 54 greatly 55 wretched 56 with 2 seized 30 Salisbury 31 the 32 nephews (i.e. the son works then 59 evil 60 seized 61 those 62 who and nephew of Roger of Salisbury) 33 put 24 gave 63 weened, thought 64 property 65 had 66 both 67 by

man

43 suoren

15 ac

men.

1

39

to him 41

45

were

26

57

58

and be dæies, carlmen and wimmen, and
diden ? heom 3 in prisun efter 4 gold and
sylver, and pined 5 heom untellendlice 6
pining, for ne uuæren 8 nævre 'nan martyrs
swa 10 pined alse 11 hi wäron. Me 12 henged 13
up bi the fet 14 and smoked heom mid ful 15
smoke. Me henged bi the thumbes, other 16
bi the hefed,17 and hengen 18 bryniges 19
her 20 fet. Me dide 2 cnotted strenges 21
abuton 22 here 20 hæved 17 and uurythen 23 to 24
that it gæde 25 to the hærnes.26 Hi dyden
heom in quarterne 27 thar 28 nadres 29 and
snakes and pades 30 wäron inne, and drapen 31
heom swa.10
I ne can ne I ne mai 32 tellen alle the wun-

ne alle the pines 34 that hi diden wrecce

36 this land; and that lastede tha .xix. wintre 37 wile 38 Stephne was king, and ævre 39 it was uuerse

40 and uuerse.

men and women also, and thrust them in prison for gold and silver, and tortured them with unspeakable tortures, for never were any martyrs so tortured as they were. They were hanged up by the feet and smoked with foul smoke. They were hanged by the thumbs, or by the head, and coats of mail were hung on their feet. Knotted strings were put about their heads and twisted till they penetrated to the brains. They put them in dungeons in which were adders and snakes and toads, and killed them thus. ...

on

der 33

35

men

on

I cannot and I may not tell all the wonders nor all the tortures that they did to wretched men in this land; and that lasted the nineteen years while Stephen was king, and ever it was worse and worse.

FROM THE POEMA MORALE, OR MORAL ODE (C. 1170)

(Unknown Author)

lore;

more

eom

50

a rede.53

Ich '11 æm elder then ich 41 wes, a wintre and a I am older than I was in winters and in

lore; Ic 41 wælde 43 thanne ic dude,44 mi wit ah 45 I govern more than e'er I did, my wisdom. to ben more.

should be more. Wel lange ic 41 habbe 46 child ibeon 47 a weorde Full long time have I been a child in word and ech 48 a dede;

and eke in deed; Theh 49 ic beo 50 a wintre eald,52 to ying 52 I Though I be in winters old, too young am I

in rede. Unnut 54 lyf ic habb ilæd, 55 and yiet, 56 me Useless is the life I lead, and long, methinks, thincth, ic lede;

have led; Thanne ic me bethenche, 57 wel sore ic me When I remember me of this, full sore am I adrede.58

a-dread. Mest 59 al thæt ic habbe ydon 60 ys idelnesse Nearly all that I have done is childish and of and chilche;

naught; Wel late ic habbe me bithoht,

bute 62

But, save God show me mercy now, too late do milce.63

is this my thought. Fele 64 ydele word ic habbe iqueden 65 syth- Many idle speeches have I spoken since then 66 ic speke cuthe,67

speech to me was lent; And fale 64 yunge 68 dede ido, thet me of And many a foolish deed have done, that I thinchet 69 nuthe.70

must now repent.

61

me God

IO

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35

Al to lome 1 ic habbe agult ? a weorche 3 and

ec * a worde; Al to muchel ic habbe ispend, to litel yleid 5

an horde. Mest 6 al thet me licede? ær, nu hit ' me

mislicheth; The 11 mychel 12 folyeth 13 his ywil, him sulfne

he biswiketh.14 Ich mihte habbe bet 15 idon, hadde ic tho 16

yselt he; 17 Nu ic wolde, ac 18 ic ne mei 19 for elde 20

for unhelthe; Ylde 20 me is bistolen on, ær ic hit awyste; Ne mihte ic iseon 23 before me for smeche 24

ne for miste. Ærwe 25 we beoth 26 to done god, and to yfele

al to thriste; 28 More æie 29 stent 30 man of manne thanne him

do of Criste. The 11 wel ne deth 31 the hwile he mei,32 wel

oft hit hym scæl ruwen, Thænne 34 hy mowen sculen 36 and ripen, 37

ther 38 hi ar seowen.39 Don ec 40 to Gode wet 41 ye muye, 52 the hwile

ye buth 26 a life; Ne hopie no man 2 to muchel to childe ne to

wyfe; The 11 him selve foryut 43 for wife other for

childe, He sceal cume an uvele stede 44 bute 45 hym

God beo milde. Sende æch 46 sum god biforen hym, the hwile

he mei, to heovene; Betere is an elmesse 47 bifore thenne beon æfter

seovene. Ne beo the leovre 48 thene the sul thi mei.49

thi maye 50 Sot 51 is the 11 is othres mannes freond betre thene his aye.52

30 Ne hopie 53 wif to hire were, 54 ne wer

to his wife; Beo 55 for him sulve ævrich man, the hwyle

he beo 57 alive. Wis 58 is the 59 him sulfne bithencth 60 the

hwile he mote 61 libbe,62 For sone wulleth 64 him foryite 65 the

fremde 66 and the sibbe. 67

All too often have I sinned in deed and eke

in word; All too freely have I spent, too little laid in

hoard. Almost all I now mislike of things I liked of

yore; Who follows over-much his will, betrays him

self the more. Had fortune only favored me, I might have

done more good; Now for weakness and for age, I may not,

though I would. Old age is stolen me upon, ere that I it wist; I could not see before me for the smoke and

for the mist. Timid we are in doing good, in evil all too

bold; More awe of man than awe of Christ doth

every person hold. Who doth not well, the while he may, shall

often rue it sore, When comes the time to mow and reap what

he has sown before. Do ye for God the best ye may, the while ye

are in life; And let no man hope overmuch in child nor

yet in wife. He who doth himself forget for wife or else

for child Shall come into an evil place save God to him

be mild. Let each some good before him send, the while

he may, to heaven; For better is one alms before than afterward

are seven. And hold not dearer than thyself thy kins

man or thy son; Foolish to be another's friend rather than thine

30 And let no wife in husband hope, nor husband

in his wife; Be each man for himself alone, the while he

is in life. Wise is who bethinks himself the while he

liveth yet; For him will stranger ay, and friend, soon

enough forget.

ne

own.

54

56

63

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1 all too often sinned 3 deed 4 also 5 laid 6 almost pleased 8 formerly ' it displeases 12 much 13 follows 14 betrays 15 better good fortune 18 but 19 may not

weakness 22 before I knew it 23 see 24 smoke 25 timid

are 21 evil 28 bold 29 awe, fear 30 arises to 31 doth may

when they 36 shall

17

20 age

21

37 reap

38 where 39 sowed 40 also 41 what 42 let no man hope forgets in evil place unless each one alms 48 dearer 49 kinsman 52

54
own 53 hope not man

56

every 57 is 58 wise 59 who 60 bethinks 61

51 foolish

55 be

may 63 64 will 65 forget 66 stranger

67 kinsman

62 live

soon

33 shall repent

34

35

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