India's Emerging Nuclear Posture: Between Recessed Deterrent and Ready Arsenal, Issue 1127

Front Cover
Rand Corporation, 2001 - Political Science - 885 pages
On May 11, 1998, after a hiatus of more than two decades, India conducted a series of nuclear tests that signaled a critical shift in its strategic thinking. Once content to embrace a nuclear posture consisting largely of "maintaining the option"--I.e., neither creating a nuclear arsenal nor renouncing its right to do so--India is now on the threshold of adopting a posture that, while stopping short of creating a ready arsenal, will take as its goal the establishment of a "minimum but credible deterrent," known as a "force-in-being." This book examines the forces--political, strategic, technological, and ideational--that led to this dramatic policy shift and describes how New Delhi's force-in-being will be fashioned, particularly in light of the threat India faces from its two most salient adversaries, China and Pakistan. The book evaluates in detail the material, infrastructural, and procedural capabilities India currently possesses as well as those it is likely to acquire in its efforts to meet the needs of its evolving force-in-being. Finally, the volume concludes by assessing the strategic implications of India's posture both on the South Asian region in particular and on the global nonproliferation regime in general.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

CONCERNS CONTEXTS AND CONSTRAINTS
253
The Declaratory Level of Policy
255
The Operational Level of Policy
290
THE LOGIC AND STRUCTURE OF THE EVOLVING FORCEINBEING
360
Limited in Size
368
Separated in Disposition
395
Centralized in Control
422
TAKING STOCK
461

ASSESSING ALTERNATIVE INDIAN NUCLEAR POSTURES
111
ALTERNATIVES INVOLVING DENUCLEARIZATION
119
Renounce the Nuclear Option
120
A Regional NuclearFree Zone
149
Evaluating Denuclearization
162
ALTERNATIVES INVOLVING NUCLEARIZATION
166
Maintaining the Nuclear Option
167
A Recessed Deterrent
205
Developing a Ready Nuclear Arsenal
219
WHAT WILL INDIA CHOOSE?
237
TOWARD A FORCEINBEING I UNDERSTANDING INDIAS NUCLEAR DOCTRINE AND FUTURE FORCE POSTURE
245
TOWARD A FORCEINBEING II ASSESSING THE REQUIREMENTS AND ADEQUACY OF THE EVOLVING DETERRENT
471
WHAT INDIA HAS WHAT INDIA HASNT
472
Nuclear Weapons
492
Delivery Systems
521
Supporting Infrastructure
576
Procedural Systems
629
MEETING THE DEMANDS OF SUCCESSFUL DETERRENCE
665
THE STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS OF INDIAS NUCLEAR POSTURE
719
BIBLIOGRAPHY
761
INDEX
857
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 16 - For the purposes of this Treaty, a nuclear-weapon State is one which has manufactured and exploded a nuclear weapon or other nuclear explosive device prior to January 1, 1967.
Page 18 - India and Pakistan, and all other States that have not yet done so, to become Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty without delay and without conditions...
Page 30 - Robert Jervis, The Meaning of the Nuclear Revolution (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1989), p. 26, n. 73. 34. Dunn, "Containing Nuclear Proliferation,

About the author (2001)

Ashley J. Tellis is a senior policy analyst at RAND.

Bibliographic information