Memoirs of Sir Ewen Cameron of Locheill, Chief of the Clan Cameron: With an Introductory Account of the History and Antiquities of that Family and of the Neighbouring Clans

Front Cover
Printed [for the Maitland club], 1842 - 412 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

But Donald and the Macintoshes take the first opportunity of deserting his standard
17
Donald Dow MEwen who arranges matters with the Earl of Ross and accompanies
21
Escapes with his life in that engagement and assists the Duke of Albany during
27
Battle at Loch Lochy in which the Frasers are defeatedalleged duplicity
31
Attempts of the tutors to repair their mistake and murder of one of themexecu
38
Macintosh endeavours to undermine his interest at Court and procures an order
52
The neighbouring Chiefs however refuse to assist in putting the sentences into
59
But the Commission proving inoperative an agreement is made to refer their dif
61
from Montroseone of their parties insult the garrison
73
Remarkable instance of his authority over the Highlanders wounderfully expe
91
Who presents him to the Kinghis Majesty in a poor statesends Middleton
99
Sends orders to raise his menbut is obliged to march before they can come
104
Monks prudent measureshe attempts to gain Locheillbut finding it in vain
110
But are stopped by a stratagem of Locheilswho are at last forced to flythe
118
Art as well as strength in using the broadswordLocheill acquires great reputation
125
The attack is successful all the English officers killedthe Governours favour
131
He meets with the General who breaks up his army and retires to the IslesLoch
137
The zeal of the nation forces them to treat with King Charles II the treaty clogged
142
They inform themselves of Locheils actionsthe isleand of Lock Arkike and Loch
143
His letter to Locheillhe makes few alterations in the ArticlesCollonel Campbell
147
Finds them the Royal army well postedthe army leaves its postand is routed
154
But relieved by Locheillwho communicates his privileges to all his neightbours
155
The King Generalissimo Lesly his LieutenantGeneralthe army at first hearty
162
But is disappointed by Lauderdale who is ane enemy to the Loyaliststhe justice
169
Macintosh petitions the Parliament against Locheillbut is opposed by the Commis
175
And on the Duke of York c the Kings letter to his Commissioners in
181
Macintosh hires him to assist in his invading LochaberMacintosh is again stopt
188
Upon the forfeiture of the MarquisMLean and his tutor apply for relief to Par
195
Dundee gets new assurances of loyaltymarches to Lochaberis received with great
239
Knockbrecht or the speckled rock
244
Dundee drops the designresolution of the Camerons to revenge themselves on
252
Provision concerning Macintosh eleventh Article of the Treaty relieved of all
257
Mr Philips account of him
261
The Earl of Levens whole regiment and the half of Collonel Hastings his battalion
269
And promised a regiment but the Prince bestows it on Mr Collierwith whom
275
Ingenious tryal how the Highlanders would behave in any sudden alarmDundee
278
Mackay marches against Canon with inferior forcesGeneral Canon calls a Coun
285
firm to King James
292
Locheill and his friends entertained by the Governour and his men alsoquarrell
294
Ane excellent officersuccessful in all his attempts after Dundees deathhe praises
298
He easily consents to the conditions of the treaty except the demanding permission
304
He amuses the Chiefs with false stories of invasions c letter to Locheill relating
310
And thereby thinks himself secureletters and instructions relative to the mas
316
Dundee arrives at the Castle of Blair upon the 27th July 1689Pass of Kyly
318
BOOK FIRST
353
67
369
APPENDIX
377
Petition by Sir John Grant of Freuchie to the Secret Council dated 19th
387
The Earl of Enzie grants charters in favour of Allan and the other principal gen
393
Locheill receives orders and retreats faceing the enemy
395
69
400
Curious situation of the GarrisonBenivissGleneviss Locheill Loch Lochy
401
Character of Glengary
405
Locheill much suspected by the Governmenthis plans to disarm its jealousy
407
The English fire upon the Camerons but at too great a distance the bloody fire
408
Dr Pitcairns Epitaph on Dundee
409

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page viii - ESQ. THE RIGHT HONOURABLE THOMAS GRENVILLE. JAMES HAMILTON, ESQ. LAURENCE HILL, ESQ., LL.B. GEORGE HOUSTOUN, ESQ. JAMES HUNTER, ESQ. THE HONOURABLE JAMES IVORY, LORD IVORY. JOHN CLARK KENNEDY, ESQ. JOHN KERR, ESQ. ROBERT ALEXANDER KIDSTON, ESQ.
Page ix - ANDREW MACGEORGE, ESQ. ALEXANDER MACGRIGOR, ESQ. GEORGE MACINTOSH, ESQ. JOHN WHITEFOORD MACKENZIE, ESQ. ROBERT MACLACHLAN, ESQ. ARCHIBALD MACLELLAN, ESQ. ALEXANDER MACNEILL, ESQ. JAMES MAIDMENT, ESQ. THOMAS MAITLAND, ESQ.
Page 265 - ... (that is, one harvest-day's work) to the king, my master, that I may have an opportunity of convincing the brave clans, that I can hazard my life in that service as freely as the meanest of them. Ye know their temper, gentlemen ; and if they do not think I have personal courage enough, they will not esteem me hereafter, nor obey my commands with cheerfulness. Allow me this single favour, and I here promise, upon my honour, never again to risk my person while I have that of commanding you.
Page 264 - I have just now declared, in presence of this honourable company, that I was resolved to give an implicit obedience to all your Lordship's commands ; but I humbly beg leave, in name of these gentlemen, to give the word of command for this one time. It is the voice of your council, and their orders are, that you do not engage personally. Your Lordship's...
Page 377 - This Chief does not think the present abject Disposition of his Clan towards him to be sufficient, but entertains that tyrannical and detestable Maxim, — that to render them poor, will double the Tie of their Obedience ; and accordingly he makes Use of all oppressive Means to that End.
Page 318 - As for Mac Ian of Glencoe and that tribe, if they can be well distinguished from the other Highlanders, it will be proper, for the vindication of public justice, to extirpate that set of thieves.
Page 320 - I do not come to you at five, you are not to tarry for me, but to fall on. This is by the King's special command, for the good and safety of the country, that these miscreants may be cut off, root and branch.
Page 103 - ... we are ready, as soon as we are able, signally to reward your service, and to repair the losses you shall undergo for our service, and so we heartily bid you farewell. — Given at Chantilly, Nov. 3, 1653, in the fifth year of our reign.
Page 278 - ... unworthy of credence. In the mean time, and as to the general charge, I shall content myself by quoting the words of a witness who was personally acquainted with Dundee, and whose testimony is liable to no other exception, save what may be cast upon him in his capacity of a gentleman and a Jacobite. " His Lordship was so nice in point of honour, and so true to his word, that he never was known once to break it.
Page 279 - King's ser" vice he was liberal and generous to every person " but himself, and freely bestowed his own money " in buying provisions to his army : and to sum " up his character in two words, he was a good " Christian, an indulgent husband, an accom...

Bibliographic information