The Theory and Practice of Absolute Measurements in Electricity and Magnetism, Volume 2, Issue 2

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Macmillan and Company, 1893 - Electric measurements
 

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Page 853 - As a unit of resistance, the international ohm, which is based upon the ohm equal to 10" units of resistance of the CGS system of electromagnetic units, and is represented by the resistance offered to an unvarying electric current by a column of mercury at the temperature of melting ice, 14.4521 grams in mass, of a constant cross-sectional area and of the length of 106.3 centimetres.
Page 854 - Ampere, which is one-tenth of the unit of current of the CGS system of electromagnetic units and which is represented sufficiently well for practical use by the unvarying current which, when passed through a solution of nitrate of silver in water, in accordance with a certain specification, deposits silver at the rate of 0.001118 of a gramme per second.
Page 853 - That the magnitudes of these standards should be determined on the electro-magnetic system of measurement with reference to the centimetre as unit of length, the gramme as unit of mass, and the second as unit of time, and that by the terms centimetre and gramme are meant the standards of those denominations deposited with the Board of Trade. 3. That the standard of electrical resistance should be denominated the ohm, and should have the value 1,000,000,000 iu terms of the centimetre and second.
Page 707 - Art. 1, it is stated that a current will be induced in a closed coil or circuit when there is a change in the number of lines of force passing through that coil or circuit.
Page 529 - ... to that in which the pole is moved, and it plainly does not matter which we suppose held fixed and which moved. Therefore a conductor in a magnetic field, and carrying a unit current which flows at right angles to the lines of force, is acted on by a force tending to move it in a direction at right angles to its length, and the magnitude of this force for unit length of conductor, and unit field, is by the definition of unit current equal to unity. Applying this to our slider in which we may...
Page 853 - RESOLUTIONS. (1) That it is desirable that new denominations of standards for the measurement of electricity should be made and approved by Her Majesty in Council as Board of Trade standards. (2) That the...
Page 855 - The volt, which has the value 108 in terms of the centimetre, the gramme, and the second of time, being the electrical pressure that if steadily applied to a conductor whose resistance is one ohm will produce a current of one ampere, and which is represented by 0'6974 (T-!jJ) of the electrical pressure at a temperature of 15 C.
Page 854 - ... 10. That an unvarying current which, when passed through a solution of nitrate of silver in water, in accordance with the specification attached to this report, deposits silver at the rate of O'OOlllS of a gramme per second, may be taken as a current of one ampere.
Page 855 - ... amperes is unity. (12) That instruments constructed on the principle of the balance, in which, by the proper disposition of the conductors, forces of attraction and repulsion are produced, which depend upon the amount of current passing, and are balanced by known weights...
Page 855 - ... (14) That the electrical pressure at a temperature of 15 centigrade between the poles or electrodes of the voltaic cell known as Clark's cell, prepared in accordance with the specification attached to this report, may be taken as not differing from a pressure of Г434 volts, by more than one part in 1000.

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