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break out unnaturally from the body of the work, and wear the appearance of excrescences, rather than branches. "We are told a kind of cock-and-bull story about a whimsical little boy, who travelled, nobody knows how far, and, in fact, nobody cares, to introduce himself, forsooth, to Louis the fourteenth. Now this, certainly, is a very singular affair, and for that reason, unquestionably, very pretty. But Mr. Godwin should remember, that he is not composing for the entertainment of nurseries. Our author too, ever willing to take up any threads but those of his story, diverted himself so long in the mill at Lyons, that we began to suspect him to be occupied by the spinning out of other matter than silk. For a dozen pages, or more, we heard nothing but the rattling of swifts, children scampering for broken twist, and the trampling of a mill-horse, who gave spring to this hubbub. On the whole; there is very little in these volumes that reminds one of Mr. Godwin, excepting his visit to Ruffigny and his name on the title.

Elements of General Knowledge, in.' troductory to useful books in the firincisal branches of literature and science, designed chiefly for the junior students in the universities, and the higher classes in schools. By Henry Kett, B. D. Jellow and tutor of Trinity College, Oxford. Philadelphia, Max-" well, for F. Nichols, Philadelphia, and J. A. Cummings, Boston. 1805. 2 vols. 12mo, fift. 350 each.

This is among the few books which merits the currency which it has found. Mr. Kett indeed is

not a man of superlative talents, but it does not require very transcendant powers to accomplish all that he proposes. His design is to give a survey of the general objects of knowiedge, which he reduces under the following classes : Religion, language, history, philosophy, polite literature and the fine arts, and the sources of national prosperity. We were at first apprehensive that we were sitting down to the examination of another attempt “to show a royal path to geometry;” and we give Mr. Kett his highest praise, when we say our suspicions were unjust. He has not debased the dignity of literature, by making superficial knowledge of it more easy ; he only gives his youthful reader a view of the objects and present state of science, and admits him to see at a distance its “goodly prospects,” and hear its “melodious sounds,” without concealing or diminishing the difficulties,

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—me 35 -MO.W THLY CATALOG UE OF NEw PUBLIcAtions IN THE U. STATEs, FoR MARch, 1806.

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}T" We cannot too often refleat solicitations to authors, firinters, and booksellers, in the different farts of the United States, to send us by the earliest of fortunities (fiost said) motices of all books which they have lately fublished, or which they intend to fublish. The list of -Wew Publications, &c. contained in the Anthology is the only list within our knowledge sublished in the United States, and consequently the only one that can be useful to the fublick for furfioses of general reference. If authors and fublishers will consent to communicate, not only notices, but a cofly of all their flublications, such use might be made of them as would fromote, what all unite in ardently wishing, the general interest of American literature, and the more extensive circulation of books.

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the traveller, I. Tables of the moneys of most of the commer

cial nations in the world, with the value expressed:

interling and conti, ii. Tables of weights and

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entitled, The Continent of Europe, or the Paris Correspondent ; and the second, L'Amerique du Nord, cu Le Correspondent des Etats Unis. In the first part of the proposed work will be comprehended a brief analytical account of all the productions, in every branch of literature, science, and the arts, which may appear on the continent of Europe, exhibiting successively to view the progress and slate of knowledge, in France, Germany, Russia, Sweden, Denmark, Holland, Spain, Switzerland, and Italy.—To each number will be subjoined, important state papers, Paris price-currents of merchandize, and other useful commercial intelligence.—The various articles will be arranged under the general heads of phyfical and mathematical sciences;—economy and useful arts;–morals and poli

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