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The publisher has thus, by a strange fatality, if it was unintentional,

completely destroyed what he had just before beld out to his patrons,

as one of the great excellences of this work....the authority it derived

from the known talents and responsibility of the European gentlemen,

who are engaged in it. - ".
: The only mode, in which the authority (and, we should say, the chief
value) of the work could be preserved, would have been to distinguish,
by some obvious mark, every addition or variation in the American
edition. We shall be told perhaps, that this is already done in hart ;
this surely cannot be denied, but we must be allowed to add, that this
fartial designation is as mischievous as none at all, because some of

the most material alterations are made, without being thus distinguished.

The first article of importance,which has attracted our attention;is the Iife of the celebrated ABERNETHY. As this article is a fair specimen of the manner in which other parts of the work are mutilated, we shall exhibit it pretty much at large ; and this will render a minute examin

anion of many others unnecessary. We shall place the extracts from

the two editions in opposite columns, and distinguish the variations by

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English edition.

... In 1703, after having been for some years at Dublin with a view to farther improvement he was ordained at Antrim ; where his publick performances were much admired, and where his general conduct and distinguished attainments recommended him to the csteem of all who knew him. He was much respected not only by his brethren in the ministry, but by many of the laity, who were pleased with the urbanity of his nanners. His talents and virtues gave him. a considerable ascendency in the synod, so that he had a large share in the management of publick affairs. As a speaker he was considered as their chief ornament, and he maintained his character in these respects and his interest in their esteem to the last, even when a change of his religious sentiments had excited the opposition of many violent antagonists. In 1716, &c.

The interference of this assembly was repugnant to those sentiaments of religious freedom which Mr. Abernethy had been lead to entertain by the exercise of his own vigorous faculties and by an attention to the BANGoRIAN controversy which prevailed in England about this time. Many other ministers in the north of Ireland, formed more enlarged ideas of christian liberty and charity than they had been accustomed to do by means of the writings of Dr. Hoadly and his associates. With a view to the improvement of useful knowledge they instituted a society whose professed aim was to

American edition.

Again— . . . ."

• Mr. Abernethy was justly considered as the head of the non-subscribers, and he became of course a principal subject of censure and discipline.

In an early period of this controversy, viz, in 1719, he published a sermon from Romans xiv. 5 in which he

*ssed to explain the rights of private

{{..., ... foundations of christian liberty.

From that time the excluded members formed themselves into a separate Presbytery. Mr. Abernethy found that his former reputation was no security to him against the evils which he was now ta experience.

Again—

He continued his labours in Woodstreet for ten years. But a sudden attack of the gout in the head, to which disorder he had been subject, frustrated the expectations of his friends, and he died December 1740, in the 60th year of his age. Mr. Abernethy was twice married ; first soon after his settlement at Antrim, to a lady of excellent character, of whom he was deprived in 1712, and again after his removal to Dublin, another lady, with whom he lived to his death.

* Again— The most celebrated of Mr. Abernethy's writings were his two volumes of Discourses of the Divine Attributes, which were much admired at the time of their publication and honourably recommended by the late archbishop Herring. Four volumes, &c.

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Mr. Abernethy was justly considered as the head of the non-subscribers, and he became of course a principal object. of reproach and persecution,

In an early period of this controversy, viz. in 1719, he published a sermon from Romants xiv. 5. in which he explained the rights of private judgment and the foundations of christian liberty.

From that time the excluded members formed themselves into a separate Presbytery, and prepared to encounter onany difficulties and hardships. Mr. Abernethy found that his justly acquired reputation, which he had uniformly maintained by a most exemplary life, was na security to him against these evils.

He continued his labours in Woodstreet for ten years, and enjoyed great satisfaction in the society and esteem of his friends. . From the strength of his constitution, the vigour of his spirit, and the uniform temperance of his life, there was reason to hope that his usefulness would have been prolonged. But a sudden attack of the gout in the head, to which disorder he had been subject, frustrated the expectations of his friends and he died Dec. 1740, in the 60th year of his age. For this event he was fully prepared, and he met it with great composure and firmness of mind, a cheerful acquiescence in the will, and a fixed trust in the power, and goodness of the Almighty. Mr. Abernethy was twice married ; first soon after his settlement at Antrimo to a lady of excellent character, of whom he was deprived in 1712; and again, after his removal to Dublin to another fady with whom he lived in all the tenderness of conjugat affection to his death.

"The most celebrated of Mr. Aberne. thy's writings were his two volumes of Discourses of the Divine Attributes which were much admired at the time of their publication and honourably recommended by the late excellent archbishop Herring ; and are still held in the highest esteem āy those who are disposed to approve the most liberal or manly sentiments on the great subject of natural religion. Four volumes, &c.

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..fmerican edition. English edition. ... Again— - * He also left behind him a Diary of , . He also left behind him a Diary of his life, consisting of six large volumes his life, consisting of six large volumes in 4to. of which the author of his life in 4to. of which the author of his life has given a large account, and from has given a large account, and from which he has made unany extracts. ...; he has made many extracts which Biog. Brit. bear ample testimony to the singular ex-> - cellence of his disposition and character. - Biog. Brit. , Taking this whole article together, and comparing it with the real character of Abernethy, as attested by the united voices of biographers, we do not recollect a more insidious attempt to rob the defenceless dead of a well-earned reputation, and to exhibit a mere corpse of character (if we may use the expression) stripped of all animation and of every positive quality, than here discovers itself. If it was of importance to know any one circumstance of Abernethy’s life, it surely was so to be distinctly informed, that his excellent heart, as well as head, secured him the esteem of all to the last, “even when a change of his religious sentiments had excited the opposition, of many violent antagonists.” Yet the paragraph, which expressly exhibits this part of his character, is expunged from the American edition . If, too, it was of consequence to know, that Mr. Abernethy’s “ sentiments” differed from many who were around him, we ought to be informed what sentiments are alluded to. Yet the American editors, instead of informing us that they were “sentiments of religious freedom,” (as is done in the original) suppress these last words, and leave us to infer what sentiments are intended, from our acquaintance with the Bangorian controversy.: a controversy, of which, we venture to say, not one reader in a hundred knows anything. Nor is this all —the English work tells us, that these sentiments were not merely the result of his attention to the Bangorian controversy (which makes them in a degree the consequence of party-bias), but also “qf the erercise of his own vigorous faculties.” This last, and, we should say, this material circumstance if A.’s authority is to have any weight on these questions, is wholly suppressed in the American edition - -- so-. Our second extract from the English edition says: “this laudable design [of blinging things to the test of reason and scripture] was probably suggested by Mr. Abernethy.” What could be more unexceptionable than this expression ? What, we ask every liberal man, can be more laudable than “to bring things to the test of reason and scripture”? Do they then really mean to insinuate, that reason and scripture are not to be the test of things 2 If so, what must we think of the firincistles of the men, who conduct this new edition of the Cyclopedia, and of the manner, in which they intend to republish the work 2 Yet our American editors expunge the word laudable, and leave us to presume, that, in their judgment, such a design was not laudable. In the next extract the latter part of the sentence, which speaks of Mr. A.'s “justly acquired reputation,” is partly altered and partly suppressed. Instead of fairly presenting to the reader, what kind of reputation Mr. A. enjoyed and how long he had maintained it, they just tell as coldly of his “former reputation.” Gracious heaven l is this the

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treatment deserved by this eminent man 2 is this history is this biography : But the first of our two last extracts discovers more of the motives and temper of the American editors, than any of the preceding. They suppress the passage, expressive of the high estimation, in which Abernethy’s works are said to be held at this day ; and though they admit that formerly these works were honourably recommended by archbishop Herring, yet, apparently lest the reader should think the archbishop's recommendation was worth something, they do not forget to strip the venerable prelate of a little epithet (the epithet “ excellent”), which liberality would allow after death to any man, who possessed a little more than common honesty and common abilities. One more remark shall finish what we have to say upon the highly reprehensible manner, in which this article is republished. The important words of the last extract, which mention the singtodar erce/lence of A.'s disfiosition and character, are wholly suppressed in the American edition. And yet, after such unwarrantable mu

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to confess the difficulty of proctoring suitable assistances to the task of criticism. This obstacle we have formerly stated, and we are again called upon to acknowledge its continuance. We have inquir. ed, but in vain, for the poem of Boiardo, and its refaceimento by Berni ; and we have not been able to procure the subordinate auxiliaries of Crescembini and Tiraboschi. Of course, we were forced to consult the accessible authorities of other writers, who merely reflect a feeble heat and cast a faint illumination on the decaying poetry of an Italian author, once highly distinguished. These circumstances demand an attention to the

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of the Italian heroick poetry as connected with him ; and we shall also offer a few remarks on the expediency of a complete transla

tion of his Orlando Inamorato. . tude and magnanimity.

Indeed we feel justified in pursuing

this course, because it is necessary

in order to render intelligible any criticism of ‘the Enchanted Lake.’ Besides, we poor reviewers are so often obliged to traverse barren ground, where not even an heath flower blooms, that we willingly turn aside into a foot-path, which may lead to cool waters and bowers of enchantment. Francesco Berni, the Italian poet, was born of a noble but indigent family at Amporecchio in Tuscany, towards the close of the 18th century. Till the age of twenty, he lived in distress and poverty at Florence. He was afterwards patronized by his relations, cardinal Bernardo of Bibiena, the cardinal’s nephew, Angelo, and by the datary Giberti, bishop of Verona, with whom he lived seven years. But neither from his noble friends nor from his own talents could he derive much advantage, for in his disposition he was careless and imprudent ; he hated every kind of restraint and delighted in pleasure, satire, jokes, and buffoonery. Yet his talents and literature secured him an high esteem among the learned, and at Rome he was a valuable and illustrious member of the academy de Pignajuoli. In that city, then so celebrated for its poets and scholars, he passed some years, and at length sought retirement in Florence, as a canon in the cathedral, and lived under the protection of cardinal Hippolito de Medici and the duke Alexander. These patrons, however, having

honoured his talents with a valu

able establishment, involved his life in misery by their quarrels and

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intrigues. One of them endeavoured to bribe Berni to poison the : other, but the poet having the vir-. tue to resist, was himself poisoned in 1536, as a reward for his gratiThis account, however, is not free from suspicions of falseness; and from. Monnoye's construction of a playful letter, written by Nicolo Franco to Petrarch, in 1538, it would seem that the physicians of Flo- . rence, being called to him when sick, had, by their neglect or bad treatment, designedly avenged themselves for the railleries and satires, which their patient had composed, against them, their instruments, and their profession. But as this construction rests on an equivoque, in the expression i Medici, it is but doing justice to the illustrious family of Florence, and to the honourable profession of medicine, to quote the letter, as it is printed in Monnoye's notes to the article Berni, in Baillet’s jugemens de Savans. Hora del Bermia non vi flosso dar altro avviso se non che havendo fatti, non se che caflitoli e baie de gui orinali i Medici l’han mandato via di Firenza, , Dove egli si trove mo non si sa, * At present I cannot tell you any other news about Berni, except that having made I know not what satires and jokes upon urinals, the physicians (or, the Medici) have sent him away from Florence.— Where he now is, nobody can tell." Some biographers credit neither of the accounts, and place his death towards 1550, and others mention that he published his great poetical work in the middle of the 16th century. Mis death was certainly obscure, and perhaps it was tragical. The name of Berni must be added to the list of scholars, who exemplify the unfortunate truth, that genius is not necessarily allied

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