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On these grounds, the United States may justly regard the British captures and condemnations of neutral trade with colonies of the enemies of Great Britain, as violations of right; and if reason, consistency, or that found policy which cannot be at variance with either, be allowed the weight which they eught to have, the British government will feel sufficient motives to repair the wrongs done in such cases by its cruizers and courts. But, apart from this general view of the subject, a refusal to indemnify the sufferers, in the particular case of the Aurora, is destitute of every pretext; because, in the second place, the continuity of her voyage was clearly and palpably broken, and the trade converted into a new charaćter. It has been already noted that the British regulation of 1798, admits a direct trade in time of war, between a belligerent colony and a neutral country carrying on the trade 3 and admits consequently the legality of the importation by the Aurora, from the Havana to Charleston. Nor has it ever been pretended that a neutral nation has not a right to re-export to any belligerent sountry whatever foreign productions, not contraband of war, which may have been duly incorporated and naturalized,as a part of the commercial stock of the country re-exporting it. The question then to be decided under the British regulation itself, is, whether in landing the cargo, paying the duties, and thus as effectually qualifying the articles for the legal consumption of the country, as if they had been its native produćtions, they were not at the same time equally qualified with native productions,for exportation to a foreign market. That ão. ought to be the decision, results irrefistibly from the following confiderations : 1. From the respect which is due to the internal regulations of every country, where they cannot be charged with a temporizing partiality towards particular belligerent parties, or with fraudulent views towards ...? them. The regulations of the United States, on this subječt,must be free from every possible inputation ; being not only fair in their appearance, but just in their principles,and having continued the same during the periods of war, as they were in those of peace. It may be added, that they probably correspond, in every essential feature relating to re-exportations, with the laws of other commercial countries, and particularly with those of Great-Britain. The annexed outline of them, by the secretary of the treasury, will at once explain their character, and show that, in the case of the Aurora, every legal requisite was duly complied with. - 2. From the impossibility of substituting any other admissible criterion, than that of landing the articles, and otherwife qualifying them for the use of the country. If this regular and customary proceeding, be not a barrier against further inquiries, where, it may be asked, are the inquiries to stop : By what evidence are particular articles to be identified on the high seas, or éfore a foreign tribunal ; if identified, how is it to be ascertained whether they were imported with a view to the market at home, or to a foreign market, or, as ought always to be presumed, to the one or the other, as it should happen to invite or if to a foreign market, whether to one forbidden or permitted by the British regulations 2 for it is to be recollected that among the modifications which her policy has given to the general principle asserted by her, a direct trade is permitted to a neutral carrier srom a belligerent colony, to her ports, as well as to those of his own country. If, again, the landing of the goods and the payment of the duties be not sufficient to break the continuity of the voyage, what, it may be asked, is the degree of internal change or alienation which will have that effect 2 May not a claim be set up to trace the articles from hand to hand, from ship to ship, in the same port, and even from one port to another port, as long as they remain in the country In a word, in departing from the simple criterion provided by the country itself, for its own legitimate and permanent objećts, it is obvious, that besides the defalcations which might be committed on our carrying trade, pretexts will be given to cruisers for endless vexatious on our commerce at large, and Wol. III. Appendix. C

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