The Humorous Poetry of the English Language, from Chaucer to Saxe

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Houghton Mifflin, 1884 - English poetry - 689 pages
 

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Page 239 - On the whole it appears, and my argument shows With a reasoning the court will never condemn, That the spectacles plainly were made for the Nose, And the Nose was as plainly intended for them. Then shifting his side, as a lawyer knows how, He pleaded again in behalf of the Eyes, But what were his arguments few people know, For the court did not think they were equally wise. So his lordship decreed, with a grave solemn tone, Decisive and clear, without one if or but, — That whenever the Nose put...
Page 420 - John ! Toss the light ball, bestride the stick (I knew so many cakes would make him sick). With fancies buoyant as the thistledown, Prompting the face grotesque and antic brisk With many a lamblike frisk ! (He's got the scissors snipping at your gown !) Thou pretty opening rose...
Page 238 - Tongue was the lawyer and argued the cause With a great deal of skill, and a wig full of learning, While chief baron Ear sat to balance the laws, So famed for his talent in nicely discerning. In behalf of the Nose, it will quickly appear, And your lordship...
Page 314 - Our love was like most other loves, — A little glow, a little shiver, A rosebud and a pair of gloves, And "Fly Not Yet," upon the river; Some jealousy of some one's heir, Some hopes of dying broken-hearted; A miniature, a lock of hair, The usual vows, — and then we parted.
Page 96 - The fair round face, the snowy beard, The velvet of her paws, Her coat, that with the tortoise vies, Her ears of jet and emerald eyes, She saw, and purred applause.
Page 339 - They braced my aunt against a board, To make her straight and tall; They laced her up, they starved her down, To make her light and small ; They pinched her feet, they singed her hair, They screwed it up with pins...
Page 362 - Street they sail'd from, by their Sight and Smell. ' They, as each Torrent drives, with rapid Force From Smithfield, or St. Pulchre's shape their Course, And in huge Confluent join at Snow-Hill Ridge, Fall from the Conduit prone to Holborn- Bridge. Sweepings from Butchers...
Page 52 - And he was kind, and loved to sit In the low hut or garnished cottage, And praise the farmer's homely wit, And share the widow's homelier pottage: At his approach complaint grew mild; And when his hand unbarred the shutter, The clammy lips of fever smiled The welcome which they could not utter.
Page 315 - WERTHER had a love for Charlotte Such as words could never utter ; Would you know how first he met her? She was cutting bread and butter. Charlotte was a married lady, And a moral man was Werther, And for all the wealth of Indies, Would do nothing for to hurt her. So he sighed and pined and ogled, And his passion boiled and bubbled, Till he blew his silly brains out, And no more was by it troubled. _*• Charlotte, having seen his body Borne before her on a shutter, Like a well-conducted person,...
Page 338 - MY AUNT. MY aunt ! my dear unmarried aunt ! Long years have o'er her flown ; Yet still she strains the aching clasp That binds her virgin zone ; I know it hurts her, — though she looks As cheerful as she can ; Her waist is ampler than her life, For life is but a span.

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