Journals of the Military Expedition of Major General John Sullivan Against the Six Nations of Indians in 1779: With Records of Centennial Celebrations; Prepared Pursuant to Chapter 361, Laws of the State of New York, of 1885

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Page 378 - thousands of fruit trees and great quantities of beans and potatoes. It might be said to be literally true of this army, that " The land was as the Garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness.
Page 421 - of God and nature, but I know that such abominable principles are abhorrent to religion and humanity. What ! to attribute the sacred sanction of God and nature to the massacres of the Indian scalping-knife, to the cannibal savage torturing, murdering, roasting, and eating, literally
Page 494 - And there was mounting in hot haste ; the steed, The mustering squadron, and the clattering car, Went pouring forward with impetuous speed. And swiftly forming in the ranks,
Page 453 - 1 have but to give stretch to the Indian forces under my direction, and they amount to thousands, to overtake the hardened enemies of Great Britain. If the frenzy of hostility should remain, I trust I shall stand acquitted in the eyes of God and man, in executing the vengeance of the
Page 421 - the mangled victims of his barbarous battles. Such horrible notions shock every prospect of religion, divine or natural, and every generous feeling of humanity. And, my Lords, they shock every sentiment of honor ; they shock me as a lover of honorable war and a
Page 525 - Venerable men ! you have come down to us from a former generation. Heaven has bounteously lengthened out your lives, that you might behold this joyous day.
Page 432 - I may challenge the whole orations of Demosthenes and Cicero, and of any more eminent orator, if Europe has furnished more eminent, to produce a single passage superior to the speech of Logan.
Page 457 - When we contemplate our abhorrence of the condition to which the arms and tyranny of Great Britain were exerted to reduce us,—when we look back on the variety of dangers to which we have been exposed, and how miraculously our wants, in many instances, have been
Page 421 - of religion, divine or natural, and every generous feeling of humanity. And, my Lords, they shock every sentiment of honor ; they shock me as a lover of honorable war and a détester of murderous barbarity.
Page 574 - They are all chosen men," said he, " selected from the army at large, and well acquainted with the use of rifles, and with that mode of fighting. I expect the most eminent services from them, and I shall be mistaken, if their presence does not go far toward producing

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