An Introduction to Municipal Law: Designed for General Readers and for Students in Colleges and Higher Schools

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A.L. Bancroft, 1883 - Civil law - 570 pages
"Designed for general readers, and for students in colleges and higher schools."--T.p.
 

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Contents

BEOTION
33
The study of law then includes much of history
36
Courts never assume to declare a rule of law for all cases but only for
47
General Powers of Courts in the United States
48
Gederal divisions having reference to the subject matte
49
Statutes in the form of General Codes
51
General divisions of this work
56
CHAPTER II
57
172
99
General character of judicial procedure
102
Commencement of the action and proceedings against the judgment debtor 178
106
The Romans did not commit the decision of such questions to men drawn
108
Interdicts
112
These folk courts among the Saxons were the germ of the modern English
116
trial by recognitors or witnesses of the transaction or persons
125
The evidence was afterward required to be offered to them in open court
131
Growing disposition in England and America to abandon it
138
Distinction between competent and credible evidence 241
141
Changes made by William I County Courts left existing a chief justiciary
146
Composition of these Courts Courts of Review
154
General character of the rules of criminal evidence constitutional rights
157
English Court of Chancery 163165
163
Purely ecclesiastical jurisdiction
169
what precedents are and
182
Divorce
192
Commencement of actions in the United States recent changes
196
These actions were invented to promote justice and facilitate judicial business
207
Conclusion
213
Commencement of criminal actionsthe Indictment
216
Relief against an instrument executed by mistake
226
General character of these divisions 386
230
Forta of action the Bill of Complaint of the plaintiff
232
Sketch of the primitive social and political organization of the Romans 497
233
Proof of the guilty intent and of motive
260
Weight given to the testimony of various classes of witnesses
266
The union of these classes formed the various kinds of tenures known
273
Decision of the cause before other judges than those who take the evidence
278
Decision of the Superior Courts fixes the law
284
CHAPTER III
290
Courts legislate as well as Parliaments
296
Meaning of the term status 501
301
Action of the Courts when the precedent exactly applies to the case under
306
Parpose of this chapter 356 Parpose of this chapter
307
OF THINGS WHICH MAY BE THE OBJECTS OF RIGHTS
308
Other nations of modern Europe bave had the same methods of developing
313
PART FIRST
315
Prescription
321
Comparative excellences of the statute law and law of judicial decision
324
Legacies
327
private violence 636
367
Peculiar rights of the Eorl
370
OF PROPERTY
376
Those from the necessities of the public 649
377
Folk land and Bocland
383
Private
387
This right sometimes exercised directly by the Government and sometimes
391
His powers
393
The power of disregarding these constitutional guarantees of life liberty
398
Its general character
399
Divisions of Private Law into
404
meaning
405
The Feud or private warfare
406
The WitenaGemote developed to the English Parlian
412
Necessity of a knowledge of feudal institutions to an understanding
417
717
419
were placed 425
425
1 Definition of marriage
430
The Marriage Relation
431
Extent of the system in the ninth tenth and eleventh centuries
433
The common law regarded the parties as legally
437
their legal status
439
These benefices or fiefs were originally for life or hereditary
440
These commonlaw rules are still existing except where altered by statute 755
444
homage
446
Character of the parental obligations which the Municipal Law enforces 767
450
OF THINGS WHICH MAY BE THE OBJECTS OF PROPERTY
455
Origin of the institution with
458
This rights and duties of each
460
WHEN PROPERTY IS ACQUIRED ON THE OCCASION OF THE DEATH
464
In determining this meaning and the powers of the Government under
468
descents and inheritances 801
471
Change of tenure by villanage into copyhold tenure
473
How wills are executed
478
Felation gave the lord the right of administering justice
481
831
487
Effect of the feudal system on civilization in Europe
488
IN THINGS PERSONAL
492
CHAPTER III
513
Classes of considerations
519
Pledge
525
General nature of obligations 080
531
how negotiated
532
Method of appointment of guardians
546
478
548
when it exists and its nature 849
551
Neither could withdraw from the relation without consent of the other
552
326
555
origin and ancient nature of uses statute
567

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