The Queen's Wake, and Other Poems

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Blackie and Son, 1860 - Scottish poetry - 352 pages
 

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Page 110 - The wood was sere, the moon i' the wane, The reek o' the cot hung over the plain, Like a little wee cloud in the world its lane ; When the ingle lowed with an eiry leme, Late, late in the-gloamin Kilmeny came hame ! " Kilmeny, Kilmeny, where have you been ? Lang hae we sought baith holt and den ; By linn, by ford, and green-wood tree, Yet you are halesome and fair to see. Where gat you that joup o...
Page 109 - Kilmeny gaed up the glen; But it wasna to meet Duneira's men, Nor the rosy monk of the isle to see, For Kilmeny was pure as pure could be. It was only to hear the yorlin sing, And pu...
Page 113 - Of the times that are now, and the times that shall be."— They lifted Kilmeny, they led her away, And she walked in the light of a sunless day : The sky was a dome of crystal bright, The fountain of vision, and fountain of light: The emerald fields were of dazzling glow, And the flowers of everlasting blow.
Page 112 - O, blest be the day Kilmeny was born! Now shall the land of the spirits see, Now shall it ken what a woman may be!
Page 117 - One half of all the glowing world, Where oceans rolled, and rivers ran, To bound the aims of sinful man. She saw a people, fierce and fell, Burst frae their bounds like fiends of hell ; There lilies grew, and the eagle flew, And she herked...
Page 116 - For she found her heart to that land did cleave ; She saw the corn wave on the vale ; She saw the deer run down the dale ; She saw the plaid and the broad claymore, And the brows that the badge of freedom bore ; And she thought she had seen the land before. She saw a lady sit on a throne, The fairest that ever the sun shone on : A lion licked her hand of milk, And she held him in a leish of silk ; And a leifu...
Page 270 - Mine's a right good yaud," quo' the Tinkler lad, " And a great deal better nor she looks. ' So stand to thy weapons, thou haughty lord, What I have taken I needs must give ; Thou shalt never strike a tinkler again, For the langest day thou hast to live." Then to it they fell, both sharp and snell, Till the fire from both their weapons flew ; But the very first shock that they met with, The Douglas his rashness 'gan to rue. For though he had on a sark of mail, And a cuirass...
Page 113 - They lifted Kilmeny, they led her away, And she walked in the light of a sunless day; The sky was a dome of crystal bright, The fountain of vision, and fountain of light; The emerald fields were of dazzling glow, And the flowers of everlasting blow. Then deep in the stream her body they laid, That her youth and beauty never might fade ; And they smiled on heaven, when they saw her lie In the stream of life that wandered by.
Page 114 - Like a gouden bow, or a beamless sun, Shall wear away, and be seen nae mair, And the Angels shall miss them travelling the air. But lang, lang after baith night and day, When the sun and the world have elyed away; When the sinner has gane to his waesome doom, Kilmeny shall smile in eternal bloom!
Page 93 - Few minutes had passed, ere they spied on the stream A skiff sailing light, where a lady did seem ; Her sail was the web of the gossamer's loom, The glow-worm her wakelight, the rainbow her boom ; A dim rayless beam was her prow and her mast, Like wold-fire at midnight, that glares on the waste.

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