The Young Debater and Chairman's Assistant: Containing Instructions how to Form and Conduct Societies, Clubs, and Other Organized Associations. Also Full Rules of Order for the Government of Their Business and Debates, Together with Complete Directions how to Compose Resolutions, Reports and Petitions, and the Best Way to Manage Public Meetings, Celebrations, Dinners, and Pic-nics

Front Cover
Dick & Fitzgerald, 1869 - Meetings - 160 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 113 - They tell us, sir, that we are weak, unable to cope with so formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house?
Page 108 - Venerable men, you have come down to us from a former generation. Heaven has bounteously lengthened out your lives that you might behold this joyous day. You are now where you stood fifty years ago this very hour, with your brothers and your neighbors, shoulder to shoulder, in the strife for your country. Behold, how altered! The same heavens are, indeed, over your heads; the same ocean rolla at your feet; but all else, how changed!
Page 114 - When public bodies are to be addressed on momentous occasions, when great interests are at stake, and strong passions excited, nothing is valuable, in speech, farther than it is connected with high intellectual and moral endowments. Clearness, force, and earnestness are the qualities which produce conviction. True eloquence, indeed, does not consist in speech. It cannot be brought from far. Labor and learning may toil for it, but they will toil in vain.
Page 104 - If the true spark of religious and civil liberty be kindled, it will burn. Human agency cannot extinguish it. Like the earth's central fire, it may be smothered for a time; the ocean may overwhelm it; mountains may press it down; but its inherent and unconquerable force will heave both the ocean and the land, and at some time or other, in some place or other, the volcano will break out and flame up to heaven.
Page 111 - If the Ministers thus persevere in misadvising and misleading the King, I will not say that they can alienate the affections of his subjects from his crown ; but I will affirm that they will make the crown not worth his wearing. 1 will not say that the King is betrayed ; but I will pronounce that the kingdom is undone.
Page 130 - If your American chief be a man of ambition and abilities, how easy is it for him to render himself absolute! The army is in his hands, and if he be a man of address, it will be attached to him, and it will be the subject of long meditation with him to seize the first auspicious moment to accomplish his design...
Page 131 - ... lords, and commons, than a government so replete with such insupportable evils. If we make a king, we may prescribe the rules by which he shall rule his people, and interpose such checks as shall prevent him from infringing them: but the president in the field, at the head of his army, can prescribe the terms on which he shall reign master, so far that it will puzzle any American ever to get his neck from under the galling yoke.
Page 149 - Thou art my father ; and to the worm, Thou art my mother and my sister.
Page 79 - Grey, 6. 143. If two or more rise to speak nearly together, the speaker determines who was first up, and calls him by name, whereupon he proceeds, unless he voluntarily sits down and gives way to the other• But sometimes the house does not acquiesce in the speaker's decision, in which case the question is put, ' which member was first up ?

Bibliographic information