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praelucere 90 4
praenomen, added or omitted 70 20
praesagire 78 23
praestare, construction of 90 4
praetexta 61 4
πρακτικός βίος 73 6
prepositions repeated 75 25; 146 13

following case 140 i
priesthoods 147 23
princeps ad 95 26
pro, proh 119 30
prodere memoriae 106 23
producere 134 5
προηγμένα 73 15
proficisci 118 18
prolepsis 69 9;
pronouns, see 'qui', 'ea', 'is', 'ille',

plural'
proximus with prior superior inferior

70 16
pura (toga) 61 4
Pyrrhus 84 10; 97 17
Pythagoras 139 31

121 17

participles as adjectives 97 22; 117

7; 121 16; 124 15
present passive, how repre-

sented in Latin 119 31
partiri 90 2
parum 135 28
patefacere auris 148 8
Paulus Macedonicus 72 2; 107 2
peccare 105 15; 110 27
percipere... perspicere 157
percipi 91 15
perducere 134 5
perfectus 72 3
periclitatus passive 127 2
Peripatetics 10; 77 10
periphrasis 99 5
perpendere veritate 148 2
persona 65 9
Philemon 140 1
φίλησις, φιλία 150 15
philosophy (meaning of term) 8 n.
Philus, L. Furius 19
placere 112 17
Plato, his dialogues 13
his Lysis 11

quoted 139 18; 139 31
Theaetetus 12, with n.

imitated 64 2
quoted 138 33
Philebus 12 n.
apology 69 11

Phaedo 78 19
plenus 152 11
pleonasm 99 9; 1027;103 28; 112 20
pluperfect, see verb:
plural of noun in abstract sense 79 26

of relative referred to singular

antecedent 79 26
of demonstrative referring to
singular 132

9
plus, in non plus quam 116 25
Plutarch quoted 12; 15 n.; 140 11;

140 12; 145 10; 147 26
Pompeius, Q. 20; 137 14
populus Romanus 76 6
posita in 69 13
posse...licere 62

4
potestas 121 18
potius...magis 95 31; 136 4
praeclarus ironical 114 1

quaestio 130 16
quam multi 141 25
quamquam 102 2 ; 141 22
quasi 64 2; 968; 103 26; 116 28;

1176; 122 31
quasi quidam 127 29
que corrective 153 20

at end of enumeration 94 13
after negative 98 1

in et...que 135 27
queo... nequeo 88 18

non queo 108 14

in positive sentence 133 26
querella 63 19; 155
qui with subjunctive 70 18

in interrogative sentence 8 21
quicum...quocum 63 17
quid=ti 8€; 117 2
quidam 67 1
quidem confirmative 91 18

concessive 106 23 ; 134 14
quies 79 27
quisque in plural 103 16

in ut quisque 86 23.
quod connecting clauses 144 19
quot 141 25

reapse 1144
recordatio 153 18
redamare 117 33
redeo 62 10
reducere (' escort home') 76 5
referre ad 100 14
relative clauses, see 'verb'
reliquus proleptic 69 9
repetition of verb in negative clause

86 28; 134 5
reprehendere 125

4
res publica 80 8; 110 27
respondere (with accusative) 70 31
restricte 124 17
revocare 125 33
rogatu 64 1
Roman view of literature 73 6; 81

19; 91 18; 142 5
ideal of character 127 30

popular morality 126 18
Rupilius, P. 19; 104 4
Rutilius 151 25

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salis modios 130 22
sapiens of Stoics 72 33
sapientia 87 3
Scaevola 15
scio, haud scio an 87 3

haud sciam an 118 23
Scipio Africanus maior 79 27

Africanus minor 14; 15; 17;

152 14

Nasica Serapio 108 14

Corculum 151 20
Scipionic circle 16 sq.
scribere 66 21
securitas 113 25
sensus moriendi 76 1

diligendi 100 19
septem ('the seven') 69 9
serpere (metaphorical) 109 18
si=cum 125 26

si... tum 94 6; 120 5
si...si 132 10

omitted in second place 128 22
sibi (in sibi suarum) 112 20
sic for talis 85 21

takes place of object to verb 85 21
significatio virtutis 116 28
Simonides 91 7
simplex 129 28

tamquam 114 26; 125 3
tantum, unum tantum 69 11
tautology 82 28
taxare 120 5
telum (metaphorical) 127 21
temperantia 115 9
tempore suo 74 22
tempto, spelling of 127 3; 160
tempus=Kalpós 126 11; 74 22

ad tempus 120 5
Terence 14; 17
theatre, seats in 93 29
Themistocles 111 31; 111 1, 2
Theognis 127 3
Theophrastus περί φιλίας 11; 140 12

style of dialogues 14
θεωρητικός βίος 73 6
Timon 142 5
Tis 67 1
toga virilis, pura, praetexta 61 4

tongere 120 5
tortuosus 129 31
truncus 115 19
Tubero 104 1
tum...si 94 6; 118 18

vero 101 31

mihi vero 82 23
nec vero 110 28

vesper, vespera 76 6
vetulus 130 18
vetustas 130 26 ; 135 13
video=scriptum video 106 24 ; 122

31
plus, nimium etc. 149 32
videor=mihi videor 81 16;

85 21

valetudo 71 25; 89 26
vanitas 145 9
Varro 13
vaticinari 92 19
ubi=qua in re 119 24
vel 129 6
velim, vellem 66 24
velle, 'to be persuaded of a thing'

98 30; 116 21
vendibilis 147 27
verb personal for impersonal 72 32;

103 22; 122 30
subjunctive directly dependent

on verb 66 24;

72 4; 83 32
with qui 70 18
limiting 74 18;152

6

I 2

concessive 97 14
in relative clauses

in oratio obliqua

113 25; 142 18
indicative for subjunctive 93

29; 147 23
present continuous 115 7
past for present 114 30
imperfect for pluperfect 77 14;

viderint sapientes 73 9

videre licet 121 17
vim afferre 94 15
viriditas 75 32
virtus=vir virtute praeditus 116 23
visum, visus 79 27
vita vitalis 88 18
ullus 115 16
ultro et citro 140 17
unum, one only' 69 11
unus with superlative 62 9
volare, compounds of 79 28
volgus 156
voluntarium 95 30
voluntas 80 10
voluptas, ad voluptatem loqui 144 26
vox 125 28
usurpare 71 28 ; 97 13
usus 101 21; 136 3
ut explanatory 79 27 ; 132 8

ut ne, ut non 110 26
verum est ut 80 31; 117 5
spem afferre ut 130 24
apparet ut 139 10
dependent on ut-clause 118 19;
position of in clause 142

4
=ea lege ut 119 31
in exclamations with subjunctive

104 2

[blocks in formation]

126 7

in singular with several sub-

jects 78 24; 133 19; 144 21;

152 32

149 2

in first person to be supplied

for qualis 85 19

omitted, see 'subjunctive'
utebaris, utebare 155

Xenophon, Memorabilia 12; 122

23; 127 26; 127 29
Apology 69 11

from third 99 5
imperfect passive and depo-

nent forms 155
repeated in negative clause 86
28; 134 5
See also ‘ellipse', 'con.

ditional sentences'
Verginius 151 26

CAMBRIDGE: PRINTED BY C. J. CLAY, M.A. AND SONS, AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS.

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

“Mr Reid has decidedly attained his aim, namely, 'a thorough examination of the Latinity of the dialogue.' ... The revision of the text is most valuable, and comprehends sundry acute corrections. . : . This volume, like Mr Reid's other editions, is a solid gain to the scholarship of the country.”Atheneum.

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“ The object of the edition is...a thorough elucidation of the Latinity of the dialogue, a task to which all who are cognizant of Mr Reid's edition of Cicero's speeches for Archias and for Balbus, will admit his eminent fitness."-Contemporary Review.

BY THE SAME EDITOR.

Edited for the Syndics of the Cambridge University Press.

It

1. M. T. CICERONIS PRO CORNELIO SULLA

ORATIO. Edited for Schools and Colleges. Extra fcap. 8vo. 35. 6d. “ Mr Reid is so well known to scholars as a commentator on Cicero that a new work from him scarcely needs any commendation of ours. His edition of the speech Pro Sulla is fully equal in merit to the volumes which he has already published would be difficult to speak too highly of the notes. There could be no better way of gaining an insight into the characteristics of Cicero's style and the Latinity of his period than by making a careful study of this speech with the aid of Mr Reid's commentary : Mr Reid's intimate knowledge of the minutest details of scholarship enables him to detect and explain the slightest points of distinction between the usages of different authors and different periods . The notes are followed by a valuable appendix on the text, and another on points of orthography; an excellent 'index brings the work to a close.”— Saturday Review.

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TUTE. Edited for Schools and Colleges. Extra fcap. 35. 6d. “Mr Reid has previously edited the De Amicitia and the speeches Pro Archia and Pro Balbo, and all the cominendation that we have had occasion to bestow upon his previous efforts applies equally to this.”—Guardian.

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"Mr Reid's Pro Balbo is marked by the same qualities as his edition of the Pro Archia.The Academy. 5. M. TULLI CICERONIS DE FINIBUS BO

NORUM ET MALORUM LIBRI QUINQUE. The text revised
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3
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