The cabinet history of England, an abridgment of the chapters entitled 'Civil and military history' in the Pictorial history of England [by G.L. Craik and C. MacFarlane] with a continuation to the present time. 13 vols. [in 26].

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Page 70 - My loving people, we have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery ; but I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people. Let tyrants fear ! I have always so behaved myself, that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and good will of my subjects...
Page 112 - EVEN such is time, that takes in trust Our youth, our joys, our all we have, And pays us but with earth and dust; Who, in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days; But from this earth, this grave, this dust, My God shall raise me up, I trust!
Page 70 - I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...
Page 214 - Nevertheless, against the tenor of the said statutes, and other the good laws and statutes of your realm to that end provided...
Page 215 - The King willeth that right be done according to the laws and customs of the realm; and that the statutes be put in due execution, that his subjects may have no cause to complain of any wrong or oppressions, contrary to their just rights and liberties, to the preservation whereof he holds himself as well obliged as of his prerogative.
Page 215 - Seal have issued forth, by which certain persons have been assigned and appointed commissioners with power and authority to proceed within the land, according to the justice of martial law...
Page 155 - repealing all Statutes, Articles, and Provisions made against the See Apostolic of Rome since the twentieth year of King Henry VIII., and also for the establishment of all Spiritual and Ecclesiastical Possessions and Hereditaments conveyed to the Laity;
Page 70 - I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust.
Page 128 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of Parliament, are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
Page 222 - It may seem strange," said he, " that I come so suddenly to end this session. Before I give my assent to the bills, I will tell you the cause, though 1 must avow that I owe the account of my actions to God alone. It is known to every one that, a while ago, the House of Commons gave me a remonstrance, how acceptable every man may judge, and, for the merit of it, I will not call that in question, for I am sure no wise man can justify it. Now, since I am...

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