A Journey from Bengal to England, Through the Northern Part of India, Kashmire, Afghanistan, and Persia, and Into Russia, by the Caspian-Sea, Volume 1

Front Cover
R. Faulder, 1808 - India - 361 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 338 - Should any future cause call forth the combined efforts of the Sicques to maintain the existence of empire and religion, we may see Some ambitious chief led on by his genius and success, and, absorbing the power of his associates, display, from the ruins of their commonwealth, the standard of monarchy.
Page 227 - Sicque for a few weeks — so well did these cavaliers fare. No sooner had they alighted, than beds were prepared for their repose, and their horses were supplied with green barley pulled out of the field. The Kafilah travellers were contented to lodge on the ground, and expressed their thanks for permission to purchase what they required; — such is the difference between "those who were in, and those who were out of power.
Page 174 - Company's territorial possessions than the generous principle of attaching him for ever to our interest by gratitude, though this has been the apparent, and is by many thought to be the real, motive. Had we ambitiously attempted to retain the conquered country, experience would soon have proved the absurdity and impracticability of such a plan. The establishment of your army must have been largely increased, a considerable number of civil servants must have been added to your list, and more chiefships...
Page 311 - ... given by the emperor, for the head of every Sicque ; and such was the keen spirit that animated the persecution, such the success of the exertions, that the name of a Sicque no longer existed in the Moghul dominion.
Page 329 - ... of dissatisfaction, made no hesitation in quitting their service, and following a more popular leader. Subordinate officers were established for registering the political correspondence of the state, and for providing warlike stores; and the administration of ecclesiastical affairs was entrusted to a certain society of religieuse, composed chiefly of the descendants of -their original priests, but they did not possess any influence in the temporal regulation of the state...
Page 338 - Sicques to maintain the existence of empire and religion, we may see some ambitious chief led on by his genius and success, and, absorbing the power of his associates, display, from the ruins of their commonwealth, the standard of monarchy. The page of history is filled with the like effects, springing from the like causes.
Page 187 - Oudh and the other dominions of the Vizier are possessed by him, so shall he possess Corah and Currah, and Allahabad, for ever. He shall by no means, and under no pretence, be liable to any obstructions in the aforesaid countries from the Company and the English Chiefs : and exclusive of the money now stipulated, no mention or requisition shall by any means be made to him for anything else on this account.
Page 332 - ... pear astonishing. In their excursions they carry " no tents or baggage, except, perhaps, a small " tent for the principal officer: the rest shelter " themselves under blankets, which -serve them '' also in the cold weather to wrap themselves " in, and which, on a march, cover their saddles.
Page 350 - I have frequently eat my meal under the shade of a spreading willow, which here, as in Europe, delights in hanging over a stream. The climate is not favourable to fruits and vegetables, being too hot for the Persian products, and not sufficiently warm to mature those of India : though the white mulberry must be excepted, which, at Jumbo, is of a large size, and of an exquisite flavour. The villages of the Mountaineers, or rather their...
Page 239 - Kalour (Kahlur) is a stronghold on an eminence, called the Kote Kangrah, the reduction of which detained Acbar, who commanded the expedition in person, a whole year, according to the tradition of this quarter. To reward one of his officers who had signalized himself in this service, he bestowed on him the captured fort, with a considerable space of adjacent territory. The descendants of this chief, who are of the Sheah sect of Mahamedans, continued in the possession until the present period when...

Bibliographic information