The prose works of Robert Burns; containing his letters and correspondence and amatory epistles

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Contents

Extracts from the Authors MS Book recording whatever seemed to him worthy of Observation 58
58
To the Rev Dr Hugh Blair May 3 1787 Written on leaving EdinburghThanks for his Kindness
64
From Dr Blair May 4 In Reply to the preceding
65
From Dr Moore Criticism and good Advice
67
To Mrs Dunlop March 4 Reflectious after a Visit
68
From Mr Joho Hutchinson June 14 Account of the Re ception of our Bards Poems in Jamaica
70
To Mr Ainslie Description of his Tour in the Higblands
72
To Mr Walker Inclosing the humble Petition of Bruar Water to the Duke of Arbole
74
ibe Highlands
75
To Mr Gilbert Burns Sep 17 Accoun Lof his Tour through 39 From Mr W Io Reply to No 37
80
From Mrs Nov 30 Inclosing Erse Songs with the Music
82
To Dalrymple Esq Congratulation on bis becoming a PoetPraise of Lord Glencairn
84
To Mrs Dunlop Written op Recovery from Sickness
86
To the saine Feb 12 Defence of himself
87
To Mr Cleghorn Mentioning his having composed the first Stanza of the Chevaliers Lament
89
To Mrs Dunlop Giving an Account of his Prospects
90
To Professor Dugald Steward May 3 1788 Thanks for his Friendship
91
To Mrs Dunlop May 4 Remarks on Drydens Virgil and Popes Odyssey
92
To the same May 27 General Reflections 51 To the same at Mrs Dunlops Haddington June 13 Ac count of his Marriage
95
To Mr P Hill With a Present of Cheese
96
To Mrs Dunlop With Lines on a Hermitage
100
To the same Farther Account of his Marriage
102
To the same Aug 16 Reflections on Human Life
104
To R Graham of Finiry Esq A Petition for a Simation in the Excise
107
To Mr P Hill Oct J Criticism on a Poem inuided An Address to Lochlomond
108
From A F Tytler Esq Nov 27 Criticism on the Whis
117
To Mrs Dunlop at Moreham Mainos Nov 13
119
To Mrs R Jan 20 1796 Thanks for the Travels
146
In Answer
151
To R Graham Esq Inclosing some Electioneering
158
To Charles Sharpe Esq Inclosing a Ballad
166
From Mr Cunningham Enquiries after our Bard
172
dence
186
From A F Tytler Esq Criticism on Tam o Shanter
192
To Mrs Graham of Fintry Inclosing Queen Marys
198
To the Rev Arch Alison Feb 14 Acknowledging
209
To Mr Cunningham March 3 Commissions his Arms to be cut on a Seal Moral Reflections
235
To Mrs Dunlop Account of his meeting with Miss 1B and inclosing a Song on her
237
To Mr Cunningham Wild A postrophe to a Spirit
240
To Mrs Dunlop Sep 24 Account of his Family
245
To the same Letter of Condolence under Affliction
247
To the same With a Poem entitled the Rights of Wo men
248
To Miss B of York Letter of Friendship
251
To Miss C Character and Temperament of a Poet
252
To John M Murdo Esq Repaying Money
254
To a Lady In Favour of a Players Benefit
256
To Mr On his Prospects in the Excise
257
To Mrs Paying his Respects On the ginhorse Class of Society
258
To the same
259
To the same Lending Werter
260
To the same On a Return of interrupted Friendship
261
To the same On a temporary Estrangement ib 140 To John Syme Esq Reflections on the Happiness of Mr O
262
To Miss Requesting the Return of Manuscripts lent to a deceased Friend
264
To Mr Cunningham Melancholy Reflections Chearing Prospects of a better World
265
To Mrs R Supposes himself to be writing from the Dead to the Living
268
To Mrs Dunlop Dec 15 1795 Reflections on the Situ ation of his Family in Case of his Death Praise of Cow pers Task
270
To Mrs Dunlop in London Expresses his Disappoint mentAppointment to the ExciseHis Religious Feel ingsRemarks on Dr Moores View of Society a...
273
To Mrs Dunlop Account of the Death of her Daughter
276
To Mr John Richmond Edinburgh Giving an Account
408
To Dr Mackenzie Inclosing extempore VersesCharac
415
To the same With a Copy of Verses
421
To the same Miltons Satan his FavouriteMisfortune
429
About a Farm at Dumfries Compliment to Charlotte
435
Bible
437
To Mr Robert Ainslie Finishing his Excise Instructions
451
To Mrs Dunlop Grateful for her CriticismsVerses
465
To Mr Peter Hill Apology for his SilenceRemarks
479
To Crawford Tait Esq Character and Recommendation
485
To Francis Grose Esq Introducing Professor Dugald
492
To Mr T Clarke Humourous Invitation to come
498
To Mr Robert Ainslie The merry Devil Spunkie
506
To the Earl of Buchan With a copy of Bruce to
512

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Popular passages

Page 9 - I do not know if I should call it pleasure — but something which. exalts me, something which enraptures me — than to walk in .the sheltered side of a wood, or high plantation, in a cloudy winter day, and. hear the stormy wind howling among the trees, and raving over the plain. It is my best season for devotion : my mind is wrapt up in a kind of enthusiasm to Him who, in the pompous language of the Hebrew bard, 'walks on the wings of the wind.
Page 163 - Still o'er these scenes my memory wakes, And fondly broods with miser care ; Time but the impression stronger makes, As streams their channels deeper wear.
Page 152 - Mary! dear departed shade! Where is thy place of blissful rest? Seest thou thy lover lowly laid? Hear'st thou the groans that rend his breast?
Page 115 - I have some favourite flowers in spring, among which are the mountain-daisy, the hare-bell, the fox-glove, the wild-brier rose, the budding birch, and the hoary hawthorn, that I view and hang over with particular delight.
Page 324 - Wha will be a traitor knave ? Wha can fill a coward's grave ? Wha sae base as be a slave? Let him turn and flee ! Wha for Scotland's king and law Freedom's sword...
Page 556 - tis nought to me; Since God is ever present, ever felt, In the void waste as in the city full ; And where He vital breathes, there must be joy.
Page 8 - For my own part I never had the least thought or inclination of turning poet till I got once heartily in love, and then rhyme and song were, in a manner the spontaneous language of my heart.
Page 177 - Thy spirit, Independence ! let me share, Lord of the lion heart and eagle eye ! Thy steps I follow 'with my bosom bare, Nor heed the storm that howls along the sky.
Page 465 - It is the moon — I ken her horn, That's blinkin in the lift sae hie ; She shines sae bright to wyle us hame, But, by my sooth, she'll wait a wee ! Wha first shall rise to gang awa', A cuckold, coward loon is he ! Wha last beside his chair shall fa...
Page 306 - O gin my love were yon red rose That grows upon the castle wa', And I mysel' a drap o' dew, Into her bonnie breast to fa' ! Oh, there beyond expression blest, I'd feast on beauty a' the night ; Seal'd on her silk-saft faulds to rest, Till fley'd awa' by Phoebus

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