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Books Books 1 - 10 of 14 on I have always thought that the great merit of the "Principles" was that it altered....
" I have always thought that the great merit of the "Principles" was that it altered the whole tone of one's mind, and therefore that, when seeing a thing never seen by Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes... "
A Short History of Nearly Everything - Page 75
by Bill Bryson - 2003 - 560 pages
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More Letters of Charles Darwin: A Record of His Work in a Series ..., Volume 2

Charles Darwin - Evolution - 1903 - 1002 pages
...sufficiently; nor do : I know how I can without saying so in so many words —for I have always thought that the great merit of the . Principles was that...the whole tone of one's mind, ; and therefore that, \vhen seeing a thing never seen by Lyell, • one yet saw it partially through his eyes—it would...
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Fifty Years of Darwinism: Modern Aspects of Evolution; Centennial Addresses ...

Sir Edward Bagnall Poulton, John Merle Coulter, David Starr Jordan, Edmund Beecher Wilson, Daniel Trembly MacDougal, William Ernest Castle, Charles Benedict Davenport, Carl H. Elgenmann, Henry Fairfield Osborn, Granville Stanley Hall - Adaptation (Biology) - 1909 - 274 pages
...sufficiently ; nor do I know how I can without saying so in so many words — for I have always thought that the great merit of the Principles was that it...by Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes — it would have been in some respects better if I had done this less, ..." This letter was written...
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Darwin's Metaphor

...sufficiently; nor do I know how I can without saying so in so many words - for I have always thought that the great merit of the Principles was that it...by Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes - it would have been in some respects better if I had done this less . . . At one level, then - that...
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The Correspondence of Charles Darwin: 1844-1846

Charles Darwin, Frederick Burkhardt, Sydney Smith - Evolution - 1985 - 523 pages
...sufficiently, nor do I know how I can, without saying so in so many words — for I have always thought that the great merit of the Principles, was that it altered the whole tone of one's mind & therefore that when seeing a thing never seen by Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes...
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Fact and Feeling: Baconian Science and the Nineteenth-Century Literary ...

Jonathan Smith - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 277 pages
...sufficiently, nor do I know how I can, without saying so in so many words— for I have always thought that the great merit of the Principles, was that it altered the whole tone of one's mind & therefore that when seeing a thing never seen by Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes."11...
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Charles Darwin's Letters: A Selection, 1825-1859

Charles Darwin - Science - 1998 - 249 pages
...thought that the great merit of the Principles,2 was that it altered the whole tone of one's mind & therefore that when seeing a thing never seen by Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes — it would have been in some respects better if I had done this less — but again excuse my long...
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The Darwinian Revolution: Science Red in Tooth and Claw

Lucyle T Werkmeister Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Program in the History and Philosophy of Science Michael Ruse, Robert J. Richards, Michael Ruse - Science - 1999 - 346 pages
...influenced by Lyell, and how strongly he advocated Lyell's position, bearing out a remark Darwin later made that "when seeing a thing never seen by Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes." To underline this influence, let us look briefly at two pieces of geological work Darwin did after...
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The Birth of Time: How Astronomers Measured the Age of the Universe

John R. Gribbin - Science - 1999 - 237 pages
...returned to England in 1836. He later wrote that the book "altered the whole tone of one's mind ... when seeing a thing never seen by Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes." And, in the most telling phrase of all, in the context of his theory of evolution by natural selection,...
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Darwin's Mentor: John Stevens Henslow, 1796-1861

S. M. Walters, E. A. Stow - Biography & Autobiography - 2001 - 338 pages
...Lyell's Principles on Darwin was enormous. As Darwin himself put it in a letter to a colleague in 1844: The great merit of the Principles was that it altered the whole tone of one's mind, & therefore that, when seeing a thing never seen by Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes'....
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The Lost Notebooks of Loren Eiseley

Loren C. Eiseley - Nature - 2002 - 260 pages
...published. Darwin corroborates this point of view. "The great merit of the Principles was," Darwin asserted, "that it altered the whole tone of one's mind, and...Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes." May 10, 1959 Useful Quotes from Emerson "The universe is full of echoes" [slightly paraphrased]. "Science...
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