The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research in Psychology

Front Cover
Carla Willig, Wendy Stainton-Rogers
SAGE Publications, Dec 18, 2007 - Psychology - 664 pages
The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research in Psychology provides comprehensive coverage of the qualitative methods, strategies and research issues in psychology, combining 'how-to-do-it' summaries with an examination of historical and theoretical foundations. Examples from recent research are used to illustrate how each method has been applied, the data analysed and insights gained. Chapters provide a 'state of the art' review, take stock of what's been achieved so far and map trajectories for future developments. As such, the book will constitute a valuable resource for both experienced qualitative researchers and novices for many years to come.

The Handbook is divided into three main sections.

Part 1: Methods contains fourteen chapters on methodological approaches, ranging from established ones like Ethnography and Grounded Theory to more recent ones such as Memory Work.

Part 2: Perspectives & Techniques includes chapters on Ethical Issues in Qualitative Research, key alternative standpoints such as Feminism, the use of computer technologies and the internet in qualitative research.

Part 3: Applications reviews qualitative methods applied to13 sub-disciplines ranging from Cognitive to Post-colonial Psychology.

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About the author (2007)

Professor Carla Willig graduated from the University of Manchester in 1986. She then embarked upon postgraduate studies at the University of Cambridge where she was awarded an MPhil in Criminology in 1987. She stayed at Cambridge in order to conduct her doctoral research into the 'Social Construction of AIDS Knowledge' which she completed in 1991. Professor Willig has held teaching positions at the University of Plymouth (1991-3) Middlesex University (1993-9) and City University London (1999 onwards). From 2001, she undertook additional training at Regents College, London, and qualified as an Existential Counselling Psychologist in 2005.

Wendy is a critical psychologist, working mainly, these days, in health. On the basis of her work on alternative approaches to health behaviour, she was appointed by the UK's NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) to its Development Group on Behaviour Change, preparing and disseminating recommendations to the National Health Service and other statutory bodies on 'best practice' in relation to behaviour change interventions and programmes at individual, community and population levels. Wendy is currently the chair of the International Society for Critical Health Psychology (ISCHP).

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