The Dublin and London magazine

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Page 41 - A man who is converted from Protestantism to Popery, may be sincere : he parts with nothing: he is only superadding to what' he already had. But a convert from Popery to Protestantism, gives up so much of what he has held as sacred as any thing that he retains ; there is so much laceration of mind in such a conversion, that it can hardly be sincere and lasting.
Page 82 - I'll tell you all about it. If you want to know where the cow is, 'tisn't Mick can tell you, for the never a know does he know where she is now. 'Oh! then, you sold her; and where's the money?' 'Arrah! stop awhile, Molly, and I'll tell you all about it.
Page 251 - He reads much; He is a great observer and he looks Quite through the deeds of men: he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music; Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort As if he mock'd himself and scorn'd his spirit That could be moved to smile at any thing.
Page 80 - He drove his cow slowly through the little stream which crosses it, and runs under the old walls of Mourne. As he passed he glanced his eye upon the towers and one of the old elder trees, which were only then little bits of switches. "Oh, then, if I only had half the money that's buried in you, "tisn't driving this poor cow I'd be now! Why, then, isn't it too bad that it should be there covered over with earth, and many a one besides me wanting? Well, if it's God's will, I'll have some money myself...
Page 384 - ... rich heiress who had consented to elope with him to the Continent ; — in consequence of which the old gentleman, with many commendations of his wisdom, for having given up the imprudent pursuit of Miss Linley, not only accommodated the fugitives with a passage on board a ship, which he had ready to sail from the port of London to Dunkirk, but gave them letters of recommendation to his correspondents at that place, who with the same zeal and dispatch facilitated their journey to Lisle.
Page 66 - Sublime tobacco ! which from east to west Cheers the tar's labour or the Turkman's rest Which on the Moslem's ottoman divides His hours, and rivals opium and his brides...
Page 385 - ... it was for the French to have fought, in the same conflict, by the side of the oppressed, without catching a portion of that enthusiasm for liberty, which such an alliance was calculated to inspire. Accordingly, while the voice of Philosophy was heard along the neighbouring shores, speaking aloud those oracular warnings, which preceded the death of the Great Pan of Despotism...
Page 447 - Does he canter well ?" said Sheridan. " Beautifully," replied Holloway. " If that's the case, Holloway," said Sheridan, " I really should not mind stretching a point for him. Will you have the kindness to let me see...
Page 385 - It was on this night, as Woodfall used to relate, that Mr. Sheridan, after he had spoken, came up to him in the gallery, and asked, with much anxiety, what he thought of his first attempt. The answer of Woodfall, as he had the courage afterwards to own, was, " I am sorry to sav I do not think that this is your line — you had much better have stuck to your former pursuits.

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