The Rover, Volume 1

Front Cover
Seba Smith, Lawrence Labree
Labree, Dean & Company, 1843
 

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Page 8 - HE that loves a rosy cheek, Or a coral lip admires, Or from starlike eyes doth seek Fuel to maintain his fires ; As old Time makes these decay, So his flames must waste away. But a smooth and steadfast mind, Gentle thoughts and calm desires, Hearts with equal love combined, Kindle never-dying fires. Where these are not, I despise Lovely cheeks, or lips, or eyes...
Page 122 - ALL worldly shapes shall melt in gloom, The Sun himself must die, Before this mortal shall assume Its Immortality! I saw a vision in my sleep. That gave my spirit strength to sweep Adown the gulf of Time ! I saw the last of human mould, That shall Creation's death behold, As Adam saw her prime ! The Sun's eye had a sickly glare, The Earth with age was wan.
Page 122 - The eclipse of Nature spreads my pall — The majesty of darkness shall Receive my parting ghost ! This spirit shall return to Him That gave its heavenly spark ; Yet think not, Sun, it shall be dim, When thou thyself art dark ! No ! it shall live again, and shine In bliss unknown to beams of thine, By Him recalled to breath, Who captive led captivity, Who robbed the grave of victory, And took the sting from death...
Page 144 - Full fathom five thy father lies, Of his bones are coral made : Those are pearls that were his eyes, Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea change, Into something rich and strange.
Page 259 - Being made perfect in a short space, he fulfilled a long time : for his soul pleased God. Therefore he hastened to bring him out of the midst of iniquities...
Page 122 - Yet mourn I not thy parted sway, Thou dim discrowned king of day ! For all those trophied arts And triumphs that beneath thee sprang, Healed not a passion or a pang Entailed on human hearts.
Page 214 - Ha ! com'st thou now so late to mock A wanderer's banished heart forlorn, Now that his frame the lightning shock Of sun-rays tipt with death has borne ? From love, from friendship, country, torn, To memory's fond regrets the prey, Vile slave, thy yellow dross I scorn ! — Go, mix thee with thy kindred clay...
Page 150 - ... to quit the smiling paradise outstretched before him ; till exhausted, and his hands swollen and benumbed, he dropped helpless down, and lay stunned for a considerable time by the fall. When he recovered, the glorious vision had vanished. He was in darkness. He doubted whether it was not a dream that had passed before his sleeping fancy ; but gradually his scattered thoughts returned, and with them came remembrance. Yes ! he had looked once...
Page 52 - Dogherty determined to give a look at the Merrow's rock (for he had always chosen a fine day before), and then he saw the strange thing cutting capers upon the top of the rock, and then diving down, and then coming up, and then diving down again. Jack had now only to choose his time (that is, . a good blowing day), and he might see the man of the sea as often as he pleased. All this, however, did not satisfy him — " much will have more ;" he wished now to get acquainted with the Merrow, and even...

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