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FOR

THE USE OF SCHOOLS,

ON A NEW AND IMPROVED PLAN;

BEING

A SEQUEL TO MAVOR’S SPELLING-BOOK,

AND AN INTRODUCTION TO

THE CLASS BOOK, SPEAKER, READER, AND

PLEASING INSTRUCTOR.

BY THE REV. DAVID BLAIR,

AUTHOR OP
« THE CLASS BOOK," “ UNIVERSAL PRECEPTOR," “ ENGLISH GRAMMAR,"
“ MODELS OF LETTERS," “ GRAMMAR OF PHILOSOPHY,"

ETC. ETC.

A NEW EDITION, CORRECTED.

LONDON:
LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, AND LONGMANS.

Price 2s. bound.

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ADVERTISEMENT

OF THE

EDITOR.

THOSE Teachers who have seen and used Brown's Testament, will immediately be sensible of the advantages of the arrangement adopted in this Work

The difficult and the long words are prefixed to each Lesson, in the same way that they are prefixed to the chapters in the above popular Testament; but as that sacred book is not well adapted to teach children the first elements of reading, the propriety will be felt of applying Mr. Brown's system to a series of easy and instructive Lessons, purposely compiled for the use of children of the earliest age. · As soon as Pelham'sadmirable London Primer, and certain parts of Mavor's invaluable SpellingBook, have been attained, this Work will be found to be a proper supplement; and as soon as children can read at sight the Lessons in this Book', they may with advantage have my Class Book, or Enfield's Speaker, Murray's Reader, Mavor's Nepos, Watkins's Scripture Biography, or any other Works of that description, placed in their hands. . For the convenience of those teachers who have numerous classes, the Lessons are so broken into paragraphs as to suit the business and practical convenience of public schools of every description.

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I advise that the children learn to spell the words at the head of each Lesson : and, in imitation of Mavor's Spelling, those of more than one syllable are divided as pronounced.

In a word, in performing this humble duty I can assert, that insignificant as the fruits of my labour may appear, I found it no easy task to separate the corn from the chaff, in selecting these Lessons, from the numerous books which have been written for children within the last twenty years. In doing this, I have been obliged to alter most of them, and have also written several originals, but these are unworthy of any particular distinction.

Standard School Books. THE UNIVERSAL CLASS BOOK: a New Selection of Reading Lessons for every Day in the Year; each Lesson either recording some important Event in General History, Biography, &c., which happened on the day of the month under which it is placed, or detailing, in familiar language, some interesting fact in Science, occasionally interspersed with concise Poetical Gleanings; Questions for Examination being appended to each Day's Lesson, and the whole carefully adapted to Practical Tuition consistent with the present advanced state of Knowledge. By SAMUEL MAUNDER. New Edition. 12mo. 58. bound.

HELPS to ENGLISH GRAMMAR; or, EASY EXERCISES for YOUNG CHILDREN. Illustrated by Engravings on Wood. By G. F. GRAHAM. New Edition, 12mo. 35. cloth.

At once exact, fully intelligible, and explanatory.” Bell's Messenger. ENGLISH, or THE ART OF COMPOSITION EXPLAINED, in a series of Instructions and Examples. By G. F. GRAHAM, Author of “Helps to English Grammar." New Edition. Fcp. 8vo. 6s. cloth.

“Among the many Treatises on the Art of Composition, we know of none so ad. mirably adapted for the purpose at which it aims as this. - Atlas.

CLASSICAL ENGLISH POETRY; consisting of Three Hun. dred and Thirty-four Extracts from the best English Poets. For the use of Schools and Young Persons in general. By W. MAVOR, LL.D. A new Edition revised and improved. 12mo, with Frontispiece. 58. 6d. bound.

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AN Ox can draw a great weight; and is good to plough with : but he is not fit to ride on like a horse.

The Ox works for man while he lives, and at his death is of great use.We eat his flesh, which is beef. His skin too is of use for shoes.The blood, fat, hair, horns, hoofs, dung, and all the parts of him are of use.

Boots and shoes are made of his hide: your comb is made of the horns; part of your knife and fork is made of his bones—and out of some of the bones we get oil.—Glue is made from chips of his hoofs, and a part of his hide.

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