Encyclopaedia Perthensis; Or Universal Dictionary of the Arts, Sciences, Literature, &c. Intended to Supersede the Use of Other Books of Reference, Volume 8

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Page 395 - ... does as much as in him lies, break or stop the pipes whereby it is distributed to the public use and advantage of mankind. He that uses words without any clear and steady meaning, what does he but lead himself and others into errors? And he that designedly does it, ought to be looked on as an enemy to truth and knowledge.
Page 353 - Christ was the word that spake it, He took the bread and brake it, And what that word did make it, That I believe and take it.
Page 177 - If the iron globe is fixed on a pedeftal an inch from the table, and a glafs hoop, or a portion of a hollow glafs cylinder excited, be placed round it, the light body will move as in the circumftanccs mentioned above, and with the fame varieties.
Page 58 - Delightful task! to rear the tender thought, To teach the young idea how to shoot...
Page 360 - Me gentle Delia beckons from the plain, Then, hid in fhades, eludes her eager fwain ; But feigns a laugh, to fee me fearch around, ?'And by that laugh the willing fair is found.
Page 301 - This seems to prove that there is a limit even in the rarefaction of air, which sets bounds to its conducting power ; or, in other words, that the particles of air may be so far separated from each other as no longer to be able to transmit the electric fluid ; that if they are brought within a certain distance of each other, their conducting power begins, and continually increases...
Page 196 - It is imponderable, and, by its distribution, in various proportions, among the particles of matter, gives rise to the three general forms of gas, liquids and solids. The particles of water, by losing caloric, have their cohesion so much increased, that they assume the solid form of ice...
Page 391 - And when the people were come into the wood, behold, the honey dropped; but no man put his hand to his mouth: for the people feared the oath.
Page 339 - Again, a painter was desirous of drawing the elephant kept in the menagerie at Versailles in an uncommon attitude, which was that of holding his trunk raised up in the air, with his mouth open. The painter's boy, in order to keep the animal in this posture, threw fruit into his mouth ; but as he...
Page 237 - When a quire of paper, without any thing between the leaves, is pierced by the electrical ftroke, the two powers keep in the fame track, and make but one hole in their paffage through the paper; not but that the power from above, or that from below, fometimes darts into the paper at two or more different points, making fo many holes; but thefe generally unite before they go through the paper. They...

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