Cobbett's Political Register, Volume 7

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William Cobbett
William Cobbett, 1806 - Great Britain
 

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Page 641 - I shall need, too, the favor of that Being in whose hands we are, who led our forefathers, as Israel of old, from their native land, and planted them in a country flowing with all the necessaries and comforts of life...
Page 79 - ... ships, vessels and goods, that are or shall be taken, and to hear and determine the same ; and, according to the course of Admiralty, and the law of nations, to adjudge and condemn all such...
Page 639 - Nor was it uninteresting to the world, that an experiment should be fairly and fully made, whether freedom of discussion, unaided by power, is not sufficient for the propagation and protection of truth — whether a government, conducting itself in the true spirit of its constitution, with zeal and purity, and doing no act which it would be unwilling the whole world should witness, can be written down by falsehood and defamation.
Page 251 - An act for establishing and maintaining a permanent additional force for the defence of the realm, and to provide for augmenting his majesty's regular forces, and for the gradual reduction of the militia of England, so far as the same relates to the city of London.
Page 343 - That every person committed for treason or felony, shall, if he requires it, the first week of the next term, or the first day of the next session of oycr and terminer, be indicted in that term or session, or else admitted to bail, unless the king's witnesses cannot be produced at that time...
Page 639 - ... measures : that is due, in the first place, to the reflecting character of our citizens at large, who, by the weight of public opinion, influence and strengthen the public measures. It is due to the sound discretion with which they select from among themselves those to whom they confide the legislative duties. It is due to the zeal and wisdom of the characters thus selected, who lay the foundations of public happiness in wholesome laws, the execution of which alone remains for others. And it...
Page 639 - ... humanity enjoins us to teach them agriculture and the domestic arts ; to encourage them to that industry which alone can enable them to maintain their place in existence, and to prepare them in time for that state of society, which to bodily comforts adds the improvement of the mind and morals.
Page 257 - I consider it as no disgrace to make the first step. I have, I hope, sufficiently proved to the world, that I fear none of the chances of war ; it, besides, presents nothing that I need to fear : peace is the wish of my heart, but war has never been inconsistent with my glory.
Page 79 - States-General, and bring the same to judgment in any of the Courts of Admiralty within his Majesty's dominions. And to that end, his Majesty's Advocate-General, with the Advocate of...
Page 341 - ... the glory of the English law consists in clearly defining the times, the causes, and the extent, when, wherefore, and to what degree, the imprisonment of the subject may be lawful.

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