Riegel's Handbook of Industrial Chemistry

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James A. Kent
Springer Science & Business Media, May 31, 2003 - Science - 1374 pages

Substantially revising and updating the information from the widely-used previous editions, this book offers a valuable overview of current chemical processes, products, and practices. No other source offers as much data on the chemistry, engineering, economics, and infrastructure of the industry.

In addition to thoroughly revised material on chemical economics, safety, statistical control methods, and waste management, chapters on industrial cell culture and industrial fermentation expand the treatment of biochemical engineering.

Sectors covered include: plastics, rubber, adhesives, textiles, pharmaceuticals, soap, coal, dyes, chlor-alkali, pigments, chemical explosives, petrochemicals, natural and industrial gas, synthetic nitrogen products, fats, sulfur, phosphorus, wood, and sweeteners.

Comprehensive and easy to use, the tenth edition of Riegel's Handbook of Industrial Chemistry is an essential working tool for chemical and process engineers, chemists, plant and safety managers, and regulatory agency personnel.

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This book contain info on pastry margarine

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About the author (2003)

James A. Kent has extensive experiences as a chemical engineer and engineering educator. He most recently served as Chrysler Professor and Dean of Engineering and Science at the University of Detroit Mercy and, prior to that, he was Professor and Dean of Engineering at Michigan Technological University, and Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies at West Virginia University. Dr. Kent’s industry experience included assignments as Research Engineer and Research Group Leader at Dow Chemical Company and Monsanto. He also served as editor of the sixth through ninth editions of the Handbook. Dr. Kent is a long time member of AIChE.

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