The juvenile wreath; poems chiefly on subjects of natural history [by T. Gillet].

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Page 19 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground ; Another race the following spring supplies, They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay, So flourish these, when those are past away.
Page 18 - THESE, as they change, Almighty Father, these Are but the varied God. The rolling year Is full of Thee. Forth in the pleasing Spring Thy beauty walks, Thy tenderness and love. Wide flush the fields ; the softening air is balm ; Echo the mountains round ; the forest smiles ; And every sense, and every heart is joy.
Page 7 - ... repair, and to the thicket some ; Some to the rude protection of the thorn Commit their feeble offspring. The cleft tree Offers its kind concealment to a few, Their food its insects, and its moss their nests.
Page 104 - A blank, my lord : She never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm i' the bud, Feed on her damask cheek : she pined in thought ; And, with a green and yellow melancholy, She sat like patience on a monument, Smiling at grief.
Page 16 - That it may please Thee to give and preserve to our use the kindly fruits of the earth, so as in due time we may enjoy them : We beseech Thee to hear us good Lord.
Page 40 - In olde dayes of the King Artour, Of which that Bretons speken gret honour, All was this lond fulfilled of faerie; The Elf-quene, with hire joly compagnie, • Danced ful oft in many a grene mede. This was the old opinion as I rede...
Page 98 - ROSAMUNDS. Thus it continued till about the time of the dissolution, when it was taken up, as we are told by Mr.
Page 2 - Nature's favourite productions, in which to manifest her power and skill ; she has combined and concentrated almost all that is either beautiful and graceful, interesting and alluring, or curious and singular, in every other class and order of her children. To these, her valued miniatures, she has given the most delicate touch, and highest finish of her pencil.
Page 98 - ... which a tomb, different from the former, was laid, being a fair large stone, I suppose in form of a coffin, agreeable to those times on which was put this inscription, TUMBA ROSAMUNDS.
Page 8 - They likewise feed their young with butterflies and other winged insects, each of which, if not destroyed in this manner, would be productive of several hundreds of caterpillars.

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