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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on God Almighty first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures.....
" God Almighty first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross... "
Bacon's Essays - Page 54
by Francis Bacon - 1881
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The essays, or Counsels, civil & moral, with a table of the colours of good ...

1680
...of Man $ without which Buildings and Palaces are but Grofs Handy-works. And a Man ftiall ever fee, that when Ages grow to Civility and Elegancy, Men come to Build Stately, fooner than to Garden Finely: As if Gardening were the greater Perfection. I do hold it in the Royal...
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Lord Bacon's Essays, Or Counsels Moral and Civil: Translated from the Latin ...

Francis Bacon - 1720
...Man fliall fee, that when Ages advance in Civility and Politenefs, Men come to BUILD STATELY, fooner than to GARDEN FINELY; as if GARDENING were the greater Perfection, I lay it down for a' Rule, That in the Royal Ordering of GARDENS, there ought Of GAR DE N S. . ought...
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London Review of English and Foreign Literature

William Kenrick - Bibliography - 1767
...Murray's letter ;o Mr. Mafun, in our láft Kevifcw. are but grofs handy-works. And a man (hall ever fee, that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build ilately, former than to garden finely : as if gardening were the greater perfection." The poem opens...
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The English garden: a poem

William Mason - 1778
...THE SPIRITS OF MAN ; WITHOUT WHICH BUILDINGS AND PALACES ARE BUT GROSS HANDY-WORKS. AND A MAN SHALL EVER SEE, THAT WHEN AGES GROW TO CIVILITY AND ELEGANCY,...COME TO BUILD STATELY, SOONER THAN TO GARDEN FINELY I AS IF GARDENING WERE THE GREATER PERFECTION. VERULA M. LONDON PRINTED: And Sold by J. DODSLEY, in...
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An Essay on Design in Gardening: First Published in MDCCLXVIII : Now Greatly ...

George Mason - Gardens - 1795 - 215 pages
...Orontes, and th' infpir'd Gaftalian fpring. PLB 4. ver. 272.] GRECIAN GARDENING. LORD BACON obferves, " that when ages " grow to civility and elegancy, men come " to build (lately fooner than to garden " finely, as if gardening were the greater " perfection -f" — alluding...
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Poems, Volume 2

William Mason - 1796
...SPIRII S OF MAN, WITHOUT WHICH BUILDINGS AND PALACES ARE BUT GR09S HANDYWORKS. AND A MAN SHALL EVER SE*, THAT WHEN AGES GROW TO CIVILITY AND ELEGANCY, MEN COME TO BUILD STATELY, SOONER THAN TO GARDEN FIN ELY : AS IFC.A&PENING WERK THE GREATER PERFECTION. VERULAM. THE ENGLISH GARDEN. BOOK THE FIRST....
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The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq: In Nine Volumes, Complete. With ..., Volume 8

Alexander Pope, Joseph Warton - 1797
...gardening was unqueftionable. " For the honour of this art," Lord Bacon fays, " a man mall ever fee, that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build ftately, fooner than to garden finely ; as if gardening were the greater pcrfection." an orbicular...
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The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq, Volume 8

Alexander Pope - English literature - 1797
...gardening was unqueftionable. " For the honour of this art," Lord Bacon fays, " a man fhall ever fee, that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build ftately, fooner than to garden finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfeaion." an orbicular figure...
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Curtis's Botanical Magazine, Or, Flower-garden Displayed: In ..., Volumes 25-26

John Sims - Botany - 1807
...the Spirits of Man, without which Buildings are but grofs Handy- Works : and a Man fhall ever fee, that, when Ages grow to Civility and Elegancy, Men come to build ftalely fooner than to garden finely, as if Gardening were the greater Perfection. BACON. LONDON: Printed...
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The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 184

1896
...in all wholesome Art, and gardening at its best is a fine art. For ever true is what Bacon says : ' Men come to build stately sooner than to ' garden...finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection.' To borrow illustrations from other arts, the champions of the formal garden would stop short at the...
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