The British Essayists: The Spectator

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J. Johnson, J. Nichols and Son, R. Baldwin, F. and C. Rivington, W. Otridge and Son, W. J. and J. Richardson, A. Strahan, J. Sewell, R. Faulder, G. and W. Nicol, T. Payne, G. and J. Robinson, W. Lowndes, G. Wilkie, J. Mathews, P. McQueen, Ogilvy and Son, J. Scatcherd, J. Walker, Vernor and Hood, R. Lea, Darton and Harvey, J. Nunn, Lackington and Company, D. Walker, Clarke and Son, G. Kearsley, C. Law, J. White, Longman and Rees, Cadell, Jun. and Davies, J. Barker, T. Kay, Wynne and Company, Pote and Company, Carpenter and Company, W. Miller, Murray and Highley, S. Bagster, T. Hurst, T. Boosey, R. Pheney, W. Baynes, J. Harding, R. H. Evans, J. Mawman; and W. Creech, Edinburgh, 1802 - English essays
 

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Page 71 - Thou comest to me with a sword, and with a spear, and with a shield; but I come to thee in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom thou hast defied.
Page 254 - Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us; 'Tis Heaven itself that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man.
Page 237 - I have been in the deep ; in journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils of robbers, in perils by mine own countrymen, in perils by the heathen, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils among false brethren ; in weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and nakedness.
Page 36 - They may show him that his discontent is unreasonable, but are by no means sufficient to relieve it. They rather give despair than consolation. In a word, a man might reply to one of these comforters, as Augustus did to his friend, who advised him not to grieve for the death of a person whom he loved, because his grief could not fetch him again. " It is for that very reason (said the emperor) that I grieve.
Page 49 - I write (whether I consist of all the same substance, material or immaterial, or no) that I was yesterday; for as to this point of being the same self, it matters not whether this present self be made up of the same or other substances...
Page 207 - THE man resolv'd and steady to his trust, Inflexible to ill, and obstinately just, May the rude rabble's insolence despise, Their senseless clamours and tumultuous cries; The tyrant's fierceness he beguiles, And the stern brow, and the harsh voice defies, And with superior greatness smiles.
Page 34 - When Pittacus, after the death of his brother, who had left him a good estate, was offered a great sum of money by the king of Lydia, he thanked him for his kindness, but told him he had already more by half than he knew what to do with. In short, content is equivalent to wealth, and luxury to poverty; or, to give the thought a more agreeable turn, Content is natural wealth, says 20 Socrates; to which I shall add, Luxury is artificial poverty.
Page 62 - I knew a man in Christ above fourteen years ago, (whether in the body, I cannot tell ; or whether out of the body, I cannot tell : God knoweth ;) such an one caught up to the third heaven.
Page 141 - ... we divide the soul into several powers and faculties, there is no such division in the soul itself, since it is the whole soul that remembers, understands, wills, or imagines. Our manner of considering the memory, understanding, will, imagination, and the like, faculties, is for the better enabling us to express ourselves in such abstracted subjects of speculation, not that there is any such division in the soul itself.
Page 18 - Though the whole creation frowns upon him, and all nature looks black about him, he has his light and support within him, that are able to cheer his mind, and bear him up in the midst of all those horrors which encompass him.

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