Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

PAPER G.

ROYAL SCHOOL OF NAVAL ARCHITECTURE AND MARINE ENGINEERING.

SUMMER DIARY.

Number of Hours spent in

Description of Work and

Remarks.

Monday

the

Tuesday,

the

Wednesday,

the

Thursday,

the

Friday,

the

Saturday,

the

From ROBERT MOSLEY, Esq. NATIONAL EDUCATION.—How to utilize those Educational En

dowments at present inoperative. During the last few months both at the Social Science Congress and in addresses by first rank educationalists, M.P.'s, and others, much has been said and well said upon education, and very important statistics have been given as to the amount of endowments to schools misapplied or applied to little purpose.

The belief that the Schools Inquiry Commission will courteously receive any suggestions made by middle-class schoolmasters or other practical educationalists upon this important subject encourages me to lay these remarks (first read at a meeting of the York Schoolmasters' Association) before the Schools Inquiry Commission.

Let the Government recognize but three classes of schools.

1. Primary (a,)
2. Middle (b), and

3. Collegiate (c). (a) Subjects to be taught.-Reading, writing, arithmetic, elements of

grammar, and geography. (b)

in addition, advanced grammar, geogra

phy, history, drawing, junior mathe. matics, French or German, bookkeep

ing. Latin, Greek, advanced mathematics,

Physical Sciences. aa. Leave it perfectly free to teachers to qualify themselves for

registration in one or more of the classes. bb. The present training colleges and the college of preceptors to be

recognized as examining bodies, with any others whom the

Government may think proper to recognize. cc. School buildings also to be certified.

(e)

How to use the misapplied Endowment Funds. Let there be an annual examination in the primary and middle schools that are certified.

Let all who pass a certain examination have the option* of a free scholarship in a middle or collegiate school for three or more years according to the result of their examination.

Value of Exhibitions.
To a middle school 6 guineas per annum 7 To be paid to the
To a collegiate school 10 guineas

master or committee.

}

Fees to Masters. Who pass a pupil to a middle school, 1 guinea.

collegiate school, 2 guineas. All the cost of examining teachers, scholars, exhibitions, fees, &c. to be paid out of the endowment funds.

Many private schoolmasters are opposed to inspectionwould not such a scheme as this which might materially affect their income, appeal very strongly to them.

The fewer middle schools coinciding, the better for them.

As I am in my 59th year I cannot hope to be benefited, but for the sake of my country I do desire that something effective may be done, and before 1870.

ROBERT MOSLEY, December 3, 1866.

Holgate Seminary, York.

* Option, because some parents might not wish their children to remain three or more years at school.

From Rev. H. SANDFORD, H.M. Inspector of Schools.

September 3, 1866. THERE are certain defects in the educational system of this country as compared with that of other countries to which for many years my attention has been drawn, and which I believe a Commission such as the Schools Inquiry Commission may well take cognizance of.

The Commissioners will be able to judge when I have stated what, in my opinion, these defects are, and what remedies I should suggest, whether it falls within their province to deal with the

questions which they involve. Defects in the One of these defects is the following: educational

I. Our national and other primary schools are in a great many system of England. instances the only institutions under the management of public 1. No public

bodies appointed to do what ought to be done (and what in every inspected other civilized country in Europe is done) by two or more schools except different sets of institutions. If anyone inquires as I have done elementary schools.

at Bonn, or at Dresden, or at Wies-baden, he will find there two or three different classes of institutions carrying on the work of education for the working and middle classes, while at the same time children of all classes are being educated at the common primary schools.

There is the Volk's schule, the Bürger-schule, Real-schule, besides the Gymnasium or school of higher instruction. These are being taught by trained teachers, and open to the inspection of public officers. On the other hand, in many English towns that I am acquainted with, * there is only one set of public schools instituted for the work of educating these classes ; in none is there more than one set of State-aided schools.

At the same time the only schools of this kind that we have, the public elementary schools, are to a certain extent attended by children of the middle class. Farmers, tradesmen, clerks, besides well-to-do inechanics (the latter class in the district I am acquainted

with being often the wealthiest of the four), furnish a considerable National and

proportion of the scholars in our national schools ; at any rate British schools the proportion of children able to pay a fair school fee is coneducate cl. :!- siderable, as the table given below will prove. In British and dren who are

Wesleyan schools I have reason to believe the proportion is confit subjects for secondary

siderably larger. The fact that so considerable a number belongnstruction : ing to this class attend our national and similar schools, proves they do so

that many parents of this class are beginning to appreciate the inadequately. advantages of the education given under trained teachers in

State-aided schools.

[ocr errors]

My experience as school-inspector extends to the counties of Chester, Salop, Stafford, Worcester, North and East Yorkshire, parts of Berkshire, Hampshire, Wiltshire, Lancashire, and West Yorkshire.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

I wish now to point out that from there being in most cases but one set of public schools for the working and lower middle classes certain bad results ensue. First, a great proportion of the middle and upper working class do not come within the influence of education given by teachers properly trained to their work, their education is given up into the hands of private school-teachers, many of whom are generally believed to be incompetent, with regard to whom, at any rate, the public has no security that the result of their teaching is satisfactory. Instances often occur of Children of children who have been taught by these private school-teachers superior

mechanics and becoming scholars at our national schools.

of tradesmen Some of the national schoolmasters have supplied me with too much given certain statistics and information concerning these scholars of up to private which the following is a summary :-

school teaching. In reading, 41 per cent of these scholars had, in their opinion, been fairly taught; 59 per cent. badly. In writing, 36 per cent. of these scholars had been fairly taught; 64 per cent. badly. In arithmetic, 15 per cent. of these scholars had been fairly taught; 85 per cent. badly. The number of scholars referred to in this calculation is as appears from the table given below,

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
« PreviousContinue »