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PAGI

Of bodies sulphureous and mercurial . . 125

Of the chameleon . . . .125

Of subterrany fires . . .126

Of nitrous water . . .126

Of congealing of air .... 126

Of congealing of water into crystal . . 126

Of preserving the smell and colour in rose leaves 126

Of the lasting of flame ... 126

Of infusions or burials of divers bodies in earth 128

Of the affects of men's bodies from several winds 128

Of winter and summer sicknesses . . 128

Of pestilential years .... 128

Of epidemical diseases . . .128

Of preservation of liquors in wells, or deep

vaults 128

Ofstutting . . . . .129

Of sweet smells . . .129

Of the goodness and choice of waters 129

Of temperate heats under the equinoctial . 130

Of the coloration of black and tawny moors 130

Of motion after the instant of death . 130

Century v.

Of accelerating or hastening forward germina-

tion . . . . . .131

Of retarding or putting back germination . 132

Of meliorating, or making better, fruits and

plants . . . . .133

Of compound fruits and flowers . 137

Of sympathy and antipathy of plants . . 137

Of making herbs and fruits medicinable 139

CENTURY ,vi.

Of curiosities about fruits and plants . . 140

Of the degenerating of plants, and of their trans-

mutation one into another . . 142

Of the procerity and lowness of plants, and of

artificial dwarfing them . . 143

Of the rudiments of plants, and of the excres-

cences of plants, or super-plants . 143

Of producing perfect plants without seed . 146

Of foreign plants . . .146

Of the seasons of several plants . . 146

Of the lasting of plants . . . 147

Of several figures of plants . . . 148

Of some principal differences in plants . 148

Of all manner of composts and helps for ground 149

CENTURY VII.

Of the affinities and differences between plants

and bodies inanimate . . . 150

Of affinities and differences between plants and

living creatures, and of the confiners and

participles of both ... 150

Of plants experiments promiscuous . . 151

Of the healing of wounds . . .157

Of hi diffused in flesh . . .158

PAOE

Of ripening drink speedily . . . 158

Of pilosity and plumage . . . 158

Of the quickness of motion in birds . 158

Of the clearness of the sea, the north wind

blowing ..... 158

Of the different heats of fire and boiling Water 158

Of the qualification of heat by moisture . 158

Of yawning ..... 158

Of the hiccough . . . .159

Of sneezing . . . . .159

Of the tenderness of the teeth . . 159

Of the tongue . . . . .159

Of the mouth out of taste . . . 159

Of some prognostics of pestilential seasons . 159

Of special simples for medicines . . 159

Of Venus 159

Of the insecta, or creatures bred of putrefaction 160

Of leaping ..... 161

Of the pleasures and displeasures of hearing,

and of the other senses . . . 161

CENTURY VIII.

Of veins of earth medicinal . . . 162

Of spunges ..... 162

Of sea-fish in fresh water . . . 162

Of attraction by similitude of substance . 162

Of certain drinks in Turkey . . • . 162

Of sweat ..... 163

Of the glow-worm . . . .163

Of the impressions upon the body from several

passions of the mind . . . 163

Of drunkenness . . . .165

Of the hurt or help of wine, taken moderately 165

Of caterpillars . . . .165

Of the flics cant ha rides . . .166

Of lassitude ..... 166

Of casting the skin, and shell, in some creatures 166

Of the postures of the body . . .166

Of pestilential years . . . 166

Of some prognostics of hard winters . .166

Of certain medicines that condense and relieve

the spirits . . . .167

Of paintings of the body . . . 167

Of the use of bathing and anointing . 167

Of chambletting of paper . . .167

Of cuttle ink . . .167

Of earth increasing in weight . . . 167

Of sleep 168

Of teeth, and hard substances in the bodies of

living creatures . . . .168

Of the generation, and bearing of living crea-

tures in the womb . . . 169

Of species visible . . . .170

Of impulsion and percussion . . 170

Of titillation . . . .170

Of scarcity of rain in Egypt 170

Of clarification . . . . . 1/1

Of plants without leaves . 17'

Of the mntcrials of glass . . .171
PAGE

PACK

Of certain cements and quarries . . 182

Of the altering of colours in hairs and feathers 183

Of the difference of living creatures, male and

female 183

Of the comparative magnitude of living creatures 183

Of producing fruit without core or stone . 183

Of the melioration of tobacco . . 183

Of several heats working the same effects . 184

Of.swelling and dilatation in boiling . 184

Of the dulcoration of fruits . . . 184

Of flesh edible and not edible . . 184

Of the salamander . . . .184

Of the contrary operations of time on fruits and

liquors ..... 185

Of blows and bruises .... 185

Of the orrice root .... 185

Of the compression of liquors . . . 185

Of the working of water upon air contiguous 185

Of the nature of air . 185

Of the eyes and sight . . . .185

Of the colour of the sea, or other water . 18G

Of shell-fish ... . . .186

Of the right side, and the left . ,. 186

Of frictions . . . . .186

Of globes appearing fiat at distance . 18/

Of shadows . . ... .187

Of the rolling and breaking of the seas . 187

Of the dulcoration of salt water . . 187

Of the return of saltness in pits upon the sea-

shore ..... 187

Of attraction by similitude of substance . 187

Of attraction .. . . . 187

Of heat under earth .... 187

Of flying in the air ... 188

Of the scarlet dye '. . . .188

Of maleficiating .... 188

Of the rise of water by means of flame . 188

Of the influences of the moon . . 188

Of vinegar . . . . .189

Of creatures that sleep all winter . . 189

Of the generating of creatures by copulation, and

by putrefaction . . . 189

CENTURY X.

Of the transmission and influx of immateriate

virtues, and the force of imagination . 190

Of the emission of spirits in vapour, or exhala- ■

tion, odour-like . . . .192

Of emission of spiritual species which affect the

senses ..... 193

Of emissions of immateriate virtues, from the

minds and spirits of men, by affections,

imagination, or other impressions . 194

Of the secret virtue of sympathy and antipathy 197

Of secret virtues and proprieties . . 201

Of the general sympathy of men's spirits . 201

New Atlantis ..... 202

Mr. Bacon in Praise of Knowledge . 216

•' Valerius Terminus" of the Interpretation of

Nature : a few fragments of the first book . 218

Filum Labyrinthi, sive formula Inqnisitionis 232

Sequela Chartarum, sive inquisitio legitima de

Calore et Frigore . . .236

PHYSIOLOGICAL REMAINS.

Inquisitions touching the compounding of metals 240

Questions touching minerals, with Dr. MevereFs

solutions ..... 242

Of the compounding, incorporating, or union of

metals or minerals . . . 242

Compound metals now in use . 244

Of the separation of metals and minerals 244

Of the variation of metals into several shapes,

bodies, or natures .... 245

Of the restitution of metals and minerals . 246

Inquisition concerning the versions, transmu-

tations, multiplications, and affections of

bodies . .246

A speech concerning the recovering of drowned

mineral works .... 247

Experiments about weight in air and water 247

Certain sudden thoughts of the lord Bacon, set

down by him under the title of Experiments

for Profit .... 248

Experiments about the commixture of liquors

only, not solids, without heat or agitation, but

only by simple composition and settling . 248

A catalogue of bodies, attractive and not attrac-

tive, together with experimental observations

about attraction .... 249

MEDICAL REMAINS.

Grains of youth .... 250

Preserving ointments . . . 250

A purge familiar for opening the liver . 250

Wine for the spirits . . . 250

The preparing of saffron . . . 250

Wine against adverse melancholy, preserving

the senses and the reason . . 250

Breakfast preservative against the gont and

rheums ..... 250

The preparation of garlick . . 250

The artificial preparation of damask roses for

smell ...... 250

A restorative drink . . . 250

Against the waste of the body by heat . . 250

Methusalem water: Against all asperity and

torrefaction of inward parts, and all adustion

of the blood, and generally against the dry-

ness of age .... 250

A catalogue of astringents, openers, and cor-

dials . . . . . .251

An extract by the lord Bacon, for his own use,

out of the book of the prolongation of life,

together with some new advices in order to

iiealth . • . • -252

PACK

His lordship's usual receipt for the gout . 252

His lordship's broth and fomentation for the

stone ..... 253

A manus Christi for the stomach . . 253

A secret for the stomach . , . 253

WORKS MORAL.

A Fragment of the Colours of Good and Evil . 254

ESSAYS OR COUNSELS CIVIL AND MORAL.

1. Of truth 2<il

2. Of death . . .262

3. Of unity in religion . . . 263

4. Of revenge .... 264

5. Of adversity . . . .264

6. Of simulation and dissimulation . 265

7. Of parents and children . . . 265

8. Of marriage and single life . . 266

9. Of envy ..... 260

10. Of love 268

11. Of great place . . . .268

12. Of boldness . . . .269

13. Of goodness, and goodness of nature . 270

14. Of nobility . . . .271

15. Ofeeditions and troubles . . . 271

16. Of atheism .... 273

17. Of superstition .... 274

18. Of travel .... 275

19. Of empire . . . .275

20. Of counsel . . . .277

21. Of delays . . . . .278

22. Of cunning . . . .278

23. Of wisdom for a man's self . . 280

24. Of innovations .... 280

25. Of despatch . . . . .280

26. Of seeming wise . . .281

27. Of friendship . . . .281

28. Of expense .... 284

29. Of the true greatness of kingdoms and

estates . . . . .284

30. Of regimen of health ... 287

31. Of suspicion . . . .287

32. Of discourse .... 288

33. Of plantations .... 288

34. Of riches . . . .289

35. Of prophecies .... 290

36. Of ambition . . . .291

37. Of masques and triumphs . . . 292

38. Of nature in men . . . 292

39. Of custom and education . . . 293

40. Of fortune . . . .293

41: Of usury . . . . .294

42. Of youth and age 295

43. Of beauty . . . . .296
44. Of deformity . . .

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Certain observations upon a libel, entitled, " A

Declaration of the true Causes of the great

Troubles presupposed to be intended against

the Realm of England" . . . 376

A true report of the detestable treason, intended

by Dr. Roderigo Lopez, a physician attend-

ing upon the person of the queen's Majesty 398

The proceedings of the earl of Essex . . 403

A declaration of the practices and treasons at-

tempted and committed by Robert earl of Es-

sex, and his complices, against her Majesty

and her kingdoms; and of the proceedings as

well at the arraignment of the said late earl

and Ins adherents, as after, together with the

very confessions, and other parts of the evi-

dences themselves, word for word, taken out

of the originals .... 408

The apology of Sir Francis Bacon, in certain

imputations concerning the late earl of Es-

sex ..... 433

A speech in parliament, 39 of Elizabeth, upon

the motion of subsidy . . 441

A proclamation drawn for his Majesty's first com-

ing in . . . . . . 443

A draught of a proclamation touching his Majes-

ty's style .... 445

A speech made by Sir Francis Bacon, knight,

chosen by the commons to present a petition

touching purveyors .... 447

A brief discourse of the happy union of the king-

doms of England and Scotland . . 449

Certain articles or considerations touching the

union of the kingdoms of England and Scot-

land ...... 453

The certificate or return of the commissioners

of England and Scotland, authorized to treat

of an union .... 459

A speech in the house of commons, concerning

the article of the general naturalization of the

Scottish nation .... 461

A speech in the lower house of parliament, by

occasion of a motion concerning the union of

laws ..... 468

Considerations touching the plantation in Ire-

land 470

A report in the house of commons, of a speech

delivered by the earl of Salisbury; and another

speech delivered by the earl of Northampton,

at a conference concerning the petition of the

merchants upon the Spanish grievances . 474

A certificate to his Majesty touching the projects

of Sir Stephen Proctor relating to the penal

laws 480

A speech used to the king by his Majesty's so-

licitor, being chosen by the commons, as their

mouth and messenger, for the presenting to

his Majesty the instrument or writing of their

grievances ..... 483

A speech used unto the lords at a conference by

commission from the commons, moving and

REOl'I.A PAGB

10. Verba generalia restringuntur ad habilitatem

rei vel persons .... 55g

11. Jura sanguinis nullo jure civili dirimi

possunt ..... 559

12. Receditur a placitis juris potius, quam in-

juria et delicta maneant impunita . . 559

13. Non accipi debent verba in demonstra-

tionem falsam, qua; competunt in limitationem

vcram ..... 560

14. Licet dispositio de interesse futuro sit inutilis,

tamen potest fieri declaratio praecedens qua;

sortiatur eftectum interveniente novo nctu . 561

15. In criminalibus sufficit generalis malitia in-

tentionis cum facto paris gradus . . 562

16. Mandata licita recipiunt strictam interpre-

tationem, sed illicita latam et extensam . 562

17. De fide et officio judicis non recipitur qua;s-

tio; sed de scientia, sive error sit juris sive

facti ..... 582

18. Persona conjuncta tequiparatur interesse

proprio . . . . . 563

19. Non impedit clausula derogatoria, quo minus

ab eadem potestate res dissolvantur, a quibus

constituuntur .... 564

20. Actus inccptus, cujus perfectio pendet ex

voluntate partium, revocari potest; si autem

pendet ex voluntate tertia; persona;, vel ex

contingent!, revocari non potest . . 565

21. Clausula vel dispositio inutilis perpresump-

tionem vel causam remotam, ex post facto

non fulcitur .... 565

22. Non videtur consensum retinuisse si quis ex

prsscripto minantis aliquid immutavit . 567

23. Licita bene miscentur, formula nisi juris

obstet . . . . .567

24. Prasentia corporis tollit errorem nominis, et

Veritas nominis tollit errorem demonstrationis 568

25. Ambiguitas verborum latens verificatione

suppletur; nam quod ex facto oritur ambi-

guum verificatione facti tollitur . . 569

The use of the law, for preservation of our per-

sons, goods, and good names . . 570

The use of the law consisteth principally in

these three things:

1. To secure men's persons from death and

violence.

2. To dispose the property of their goods and

lands.

3. For preservation of their good names from

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