Embodying Ambiguity: Androgyny and Aesthetics from Winckelmann to Keller

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Wayne State University Press, 1998 - Literary Criticism - 302 pages
Embodying Ambiguity traces the shifts in the representation of the androgyny myth in the literature and aesthetics of the late eighteenth century and nineteenth century. Catriona MacLeod examines important pedagogic implications of the androgyny ideal for Classical, Romantic, and Realist texts, beginning with Aristophane's narrative of the origin of human sexuality in Plato's Symposium and including the hermaphroditic androgyny proposed by Winckelmann and the heterosexual complementary model found in Schiller and Schlegel.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
9
Toward an Androgynous Aesthetic
25
2
91
3
141
Collecting Statues
185
SexualTextual Refractions in the Narratives
207
Coda
229
Bibliography
277
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

MacLeod is an assistant professor of German at Yale University.

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