Letters from a Father to His Sons in College

Front Cover
Grigg and Elliot, 1843 - College ethics - 344 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 93 - And the Spirit and the bride say, come. And let him that heareth, say, come. And let him that is athirst, come; and whosoever will, let him come and take of the water of life freely.
Page 101 - the ways of wisdom are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths peace," is it wise to say, " Let me put off the attainment of this happiness to a future period?" Surely the sooner you begin to enjoy advantages so radical and precious, the better. Besides, have you any assurance that you will live to that age, or to see that concurrence of circumstances, which you fondly imagine will be more favorable to engaging in a life of piety than the present time ? Not long since, a graduate of one of our colleges...
Page 82 - For the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God, neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned.
Page 97 - Truly the light is sweet, and a pleasant thing it is for the eyes to behold the sun : but if a man live many years, and rejoice in them all ; yet let him remember the days of darkness ; for they shall be many.
Page 99 - I should prefer a firm religious belief to every other blessing : for it makes life a discipline of goodness, creates new hopes when all earthly hopes vanish, and throws over the decay, the destruction of existence, the most gorgeous of all lights, awakens life even in death, and from corruption and decay calls up beauty and divinity, makes an instrument of...
Page 178 - But if any provide not for his own, and especially for those of his own house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel.
Page 89 - Be it known unto you. therefore, men and brethren, that through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins, and by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which they could not be justified by the law of Moses.
Page 219 - Above all things, let him never touch a romance or novel: these paint beauty in colours more charming than nature, and describe happiness that man never tastes. How delusive, how destructive are those pictures of consummate bliss! They teach the youthful mind to sigh after beauty and happiness that never existed; to despise the little good which fortune has mixed in our cup, by expecting more than she ever gave...
Page 99 - I envy no quality of the mind or intellect in others ; not genius, power, wit, or fancy ; but, if I could choose what would be most delightful, and, I believe, most useful to me, I should prefer a firm religious belief to every other blessing ; for it makes life a discipline of goodness — creates new hopes, when all earthly hopes vanish ; and throws over the decay, the destruction of existence, the most gorgeous of all lights ; awakens life even in death, and from corruption and decay calls up...
Page 98 - no quality of the mind or intellect in others; not genius, power, wit or fancy; but if I could choose what would be most delightful, and, I believe, most useful to me, I should prefer a firm religious belief to every other blessing...

Bibliographic information