The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 10

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G.P.Putnam and sons, 1899
 

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The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (FE); Paul Leicester Ford, Editor; Copyright, 1899, G.P. Putnam's Sons; 10 Volume collection; Vol. X: 1816 - 1826

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Vol. X

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Page 4 - If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.
Page 114 - ... the term is not very distant, at which we are to deposit in the same cerement, our sorrows and suffering bodies, and to ascend in essence to an ecstatic meeting* with the friends we have loved and lost, and whom we shall still love and never lose again.
Page 170 - The judiciary of the United States is the subtle corps of sappers and miners constantly working under ground to undermine the foundations of our confederated fabric. They are construing our constitution from a co-ordination of a general and special government to a general and supreme one alone.
Page 278 - Not that I would purchase even her amity at the price of taking part in her wars. But the war in which the present proposition might engage us, should that be its consequence, is not her war, but ours.
Page 157 - The cession of that kind of property, for so it is misnamed, is a bagatelle which would not cost me a second thought, if, in that way, a general emancipation and expatriation could be effected ; and, gradually, and with due sacrifices, I think it might be. But as it is, we have the wolf by the ears, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go. Justice is in one scale, and self-preservation in the other.
Page 120 - The next observed, that the word makes might as well be omitted, because his customers would not care who made the hats; if good, and to their mind, they would buy, by whomsoever made. He struck it out. A third said he thought the words for ready money, were useless, as it was not the custom of the place to sell on credit.
Page 161 - I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion by education.
Page 102 - A system of general instruction, which shall reach every description of our citizens, from the richest to the poorest, as it was the earliest, so it shall be the latest of all the public concerns in which I shall permit myself to take an interest.
Page 41 - ... in government, as well as in every other business of life, it is by division and subdivision of duties alone, that all matters, great and small, can be managed to perfection.
Page 42 - Some men look at constitutions with sanctimonious reverence, and deem them like the ark of the covenant, too sacred to be touched. They ascribe to the men of the preceding age a wisdom more than human, and suppose what they did to be beyond amendment.

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