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accordance with her desire, her remains were taken back to Colorado and buried on Mount Jackson, a peak named in her honor, looking down into the wild, weird pass of the Rocky Mountains known as Cheyenne Canyon. This spot had been very dear to Mrs. Jackson. Near here was the log cabin which had been built for her as a quiet literary retreat and where she had spent so many happy hours with her friends.

Tourists who visit Colorado Springs seldom fail to visit the lonely grave of Helen Hunt Jackson and her cabin home. A certain traveler thus describes his trip: "We drove as far as a vehicle could pass up the mountain road that wound along a little stream which came tumbling down the narrow ravine, splitting the mountain in twain. Soon we were compelled to abandon the wagon, and on foot we climbed the rugged way, first on one side and then on the other of the rushing rivulet where the narrow path could find space enough to lay its crooked length along. Suddenly a little log cabin in a clump of trees burst on our view. A boy with a Winchester rifle slung over his shoulder met us a few feet from the door and requested a fee of twenty-five cents each before we were permitted to pass. “This is the house Helen Hunt lived in, and away above there is where she is buried,' the boy replied in answer to questions. We inspected the house, and then, over more rocky steeps, we climbed to the spot indicated near a falling cataract and stood beside a pile of stones thrown together by hundreds of tourists who had preceded us.

We gathered some stones and added them to the pile and left her alone by the singing cataract, beneath the sighing branches of the firs and pines which stood like towering sentinels around her on Mount Jackson. “What a monument!' exclaimed one of our party, ‘more lasting than hammered bronze! But not more lasting than the good she has done. Her influence will live while this mountain shall stand, unless another dark age should sweep literature out of existence. Of all American writers, she has been the Indian's greatest benefactor. I only wonder that they do not convert this place into a shrine and come here to worship.''

A PARTIAL LIST OF H. H. JACKSON'S WRITINGS. Verses by “H. H.”

Bits of Travel. Sonnets and Lyrics.

Bits of Talk About Home Mercy Philbrick's Choice. Matters. The "No Name" Series. Hetty's Strange History. Ramona.

A Century of Dishonor.

DIRECTIONS FOR STUDY.

I. Commit the poem to memory.
II. Explain stanzas 3, 5 and 6.
III. Name some of the boasts of June.
IV. Contrast June and October.
V. Which is your favorite month? Why?

OCTOBER'S BRIGHT BLUE WEATHER.

O suns and skies and clouds of June,

And flowers of June together,
Ye cannot rival for one hour

October's bright blue weather.

When loud the bumble-bee makes haste,

Belated, thriftless, vagrant,

And golden rod is dying fast,

And lanes with grapes are fragrant;

When gentians roll their fringes tight

To save them from the morning, And chestnuts fall from satin burrs

Without a sound of warning;

When on the ground red applies lie

In piles like jewels shining;
And redder still on old stone walls

Are leaves of woodbine twining;

When all the lovely wayside things

Their white-winged seeds are sowing, And in the fields, still green and fair,

Late aftermath are growing ;

When springs run low, and on the brooks,

In idle golden freighting,
Bright leaves sink noiseless in the hush

Of woods, for winter waiting ;

When comrades seek sweet country haunts,

By twos and twos together,
And count like misers hour by hour,

October's bright blue weather.

O suns and skies and flowers of June,

Count all your boasts together, Love loveth best of all the year,

October's bright blue weather.

QUESTIONS ON MRS. JACKSON.

1. Write a brief sketch of Mrs. Jackson's life.

2. Name her best known work. What race of men did it benefit ?

3. Name three other books. Three poems. 4. Quote two memory gems.

5. Where is Mrs. Jackson buried ? Sketch the tourist's description of her grave.

6. Write a brief review of Ramona.
7. Compare Mrs. Jackson and Mrs. Stowe.

-Helen Hunt Jackson.

“Education is a life work, and not a matter to be crowded into a few early years.Tourgee.

CHAPTER V.

OTHER AMERICAN WRITERS WHOM WE

SHOULD KNOW.

“With perseverance the very odds and ends of time may be worked up into results of the greatest value.

HORACE MANN.

EDWARD EVERETT HALE. HENRY WARD BEECHER. BAYARD TAYLOR. HENRY D. THOREAU.

LEWIS WALLACE. J. G. HOLLAND.

EDWARD EGGLESTON.
THOMAS B. READ.

W. D. HOWELLS.
BRET HARTE.

THE GREAT HISTORIANS.

PRESCOTT.
BANCROFT.

MOTLEY.
PARKMAN.

"The best things are nearest-light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of God just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things of life.”-Selected.

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