History of the conquest of England by the Normans, tr. by W. Hazlitt, Volume 2

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Page 23 - They greatly oppressed the wretched people by making them work at these castles, and when the castles were finished they filled them with devils and evil men. Then they took those whom they suspected to have any goods, by night and by day, seizing both men and women, and they put them in prison for their gold and silver and tortured them with pains unspeakable ; for never were any martyrs tortured as these were.
Page 2 - Literary History of the Middle Ages ; comprehending an Account of the State of Learning from the Close of the Reign of Augustus to its Revival in the Fifteenth Century.
Page 358 - As for all those of our subjects who will not, of their own accord, swear to join the five-and-twenty barons in distraining and distressing us, we will issue orders to make them take the same oath as aforesaid. And if any one of the five-andtwenty barons...
Page 353 - And if any matters cannot be determined on the day appointed for holding the assizes in each county, so many of the knights and freeholders as have been at the assizes aforesaid, shall stay to decide them, as is necessary, according as there is more or less business.
Page 353 - No scutage or aid shall be imposed in our kingdom, unless by the general council of our kingdom...
Page 354 - ... none of the aforesaid amerciaments shall be assessed but by the oath of honest men in the neighbourhood.
Page 353 - Common pleas shall not follow our court, but shall be holden in some place certain. 18. Assizes of novel disseisin, and of mort d'ancestor, and of darrien presentment, shall not be taken but in their proper counties, and after this manner : We, or, if we should be out of the realm, our chief...
Page 356 - ... barons hereafter mentioned for the preservation of the peace, or of the major part of them, together with the aforesaid Stephen, archbishop of Canterbury, if he can be present, and others whom he shall think fit to take along with him ; and...
Page 355 - No freeman shall be taken or imprisoned, or disseised, or outlawed, or banished, or any ways destroyed, nor will we pass upon him, nor will we send upon him, unless by the lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land.
Page 357 - ... barons be plaintiffs in the same cause, they shall be set aside as to what concerns this particular affair, and others be chosen in their room, out of the said fiveand-twenty, and sworn by the rest to decide the matter.

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