The History and Proceedings of the House of Lords, from the Restoration in 1660, to the Present Time ... With an Account of the Promotions of the Several Peers, and the State of the Peerage in Every Reign: Connected with the Transactions of the Commons, and History of the Times, And Illustrated with Historical Notes and Observations. Together with the Debates in the Parliament of Scotland Relating to the Union. To Each Volume are Added Proper Indexes ...

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Page 392 - Luxury, my Lords, is to be taxed, but vice prohibited, let the difficulties in executing the law be what they will. Would you lay a tax upon a breach of the Ten Commandments? Would not such a tax be wicked and scandalous ; because it would imply an.
Page 450 - ... hindered by raising its price, and its price is to be raised by the imposition of a duty. This, my Lords, which is, I suppose...
Page 452 - I affected with the merit of the wonderful skill which the distillers are said to have attained, that it is, in my opinion, no faculty of great use to mankind to prepare palatable poison ; nor shall I ever contribute my interest for the reprieve of a murderer, because he has, by long practice, obtained great dexterity in his trade.
Page 118 - Majefty that it may be enacled ; and be it enacted by the King's moft Excellent Majefty, by and with the Advice and Confent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this prefent Parliament affembled, and by the Authority of the...
Page 453 - I. am not so easily persuaded, my lords, that our ministers really intend to supply the defects that may hereafter be discovered in this bill. It will doubtless produce money, perhaps much more than they appear to expect from it. I doubt not...
Page 159 - The bill is, in my opinion, calculated to make a defence impossible, to deprive innocence of its guard, and to let loose oppression and perjury upon the world. It is a bill to dazzle the wicked with a prospect of security, and to incite them to purchase an indemnity for one crime, by the perpetration of another.
Page 449 - ... them. Even the most beneficial and useful bill that ministers can possibly imagine, a bill for laying on our estates a tax of the fifth part of their yearly value, would be wholly without effect if collectors could not be obtained. I am therefore, my lords, yet doubtful whether the inefficacy...
Page 451 - ... duty may levy a greater ; nor can they be easily deceived with regard to the quantities that are made — the deceits, at least, that can be...
Page 454 - This, my lords, is very reasonable, and therefore we ought to exert ourselves for the safety of the nation while the power is yet in our own hands, and, without regard to the opinion or proceedings of the other House show that we are yet the chief guardians of the people. The ready compliance of the Commons with the measures proposed in this bill has been mentioned here, with...
Page 393 - ... of that government, under which all restraints are taken away ? But, to a bill for such desirable purposes...

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