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THE NAME OF GOD, WITH A SLING AND A STONE, WILL DO MORE THAN GOLIATH WITH ALL HIS ARMOUR.

which environed their city, 2 Ki. xiv. 7; 2 Ch.xxv. 12 in the time of the Greek emperors, and Idumea was Idumæa was subsequently invaded, first by Uzziah, included in what was called the third Palestine, king of Judah ; afterwards by the Assyrians; and, But this ancient and once fruitful country had finally, by the Chaldeans, who completely ravaged been devoted by Jehovah to become a perpetual dethe country, and rendered it almost a wilderness.

solation. Nor can one word of the Divine threatenNotwithstanding the repeated disasters with which ings fail of their accomplishment. Let the reader Edom was visited, there always reigned at Petra, ac carefully read the following passages of Scripture, cording to Strabo, several ages before the Christian and compare them with the annexed quotation from era, a king of the royal lineage, with whom a prince

Keith's Evidence of Prophecy, and say if one word was associated in the government. The ancient has failed of all that the Lord God has denounced on enmity of Esau to Jacob never appears, however, to

that accursed and desolate land, Is. xxxiv. ; Je. xlix.; have been laid aside. For several years previous to Eze. XXV., XXXV." There shall not be any remaining the extinction of the kingdom of Judah, the Idu of the house of Esau; for the LORD hath spoken it," mæans encroached upon the Jewish territories, and Obad. 18 ver. extended their dominion over the south-western part But the house of Esau did remain, and existed in of the Holy Land.'--Sime's Sacred Geography. great power, till after the commencement of the

Christian era, a period far too remote from the date In a sedition which arose among the inhabite of the prediction for their subsequent history to have ants of this country, during the Babylonish cap- been foreseen by man. The Idumæans were soon tivity, when the land of Judæa lay desolate, a party after mingled with the Nabatheans. And in the third of them went off, and took possession of as much of

century their language was disused, and their very the south-western part of it as bad constituted the

name, as designating any people, had utterly perished; whole of the inheritance of the tribe of Simeon, and

and their country itself having become an outcast half that of the tribe of Judah ; and this part of the

from Syria, among whose kingdoms it had long been land of Judæa, together with part of Arabia lying

numbered, was united to Arabia Petrea. | contiguous to it, constituted the canton of Palestine

Idumæa contained at least eighteen towns, for centhat was designated "Idumaa.” During the wars of the Maccabees, John Hyrcanus conquered these

turies after the Christian era-successive kings and Idumeans, and obliged them either to embrace the

princes reigned in Petra-and magnificent palaces Jewish religion, or abandon their country. They and temples, whose empty chambers and naked walls chose the former, and thus were not only received

of wonderful architecture still strike the traveller into the Jewish church, but were incorporated with

with amazement, were constructed there, at a period the Jewish nation; so that they henceforth considered

unquestionably remote from the time when it was themselves, and were usually styled Jews. They did

given to the prophets of Israel to tell that the house not however lose the name of Idumæans, till about

of Esau was to be cut off for ever, that there would the end of the first century of the Christian era. The

be no kingdom there, and that wild animals would name of their country occurs in Mark iii. 8, (p. 200,)

possess Edom for an heritage. And so despised is among places wherein people resorted to Christ.'

Edom, and the memory of its greatness lost, that | Ransom's Lectures, p. 313, from Prideaux's Connec

there is no record of antiquity that can so clearly tion, Vol. I. pp. 34. .5: Vol. III. pp. 267, 404.

shew us what once it was, in the days of its power, as

we can now read, in the page of prophecy, its existing They continued to form a powerful people atter desolation. But in that place where kings kept their Judæa was reduced to a Roman province. Hebron,

court, and where nobles assembled; where manifest their capital in Judæa, had been subdued, but Petra

| proofs of ancient opulence are concentrated; where still remained a place of great strength; and even

princely habitations, retaining their external gran| Pompey, the Roman general, would not attempt its deur, but bereft of all their splendour, still look as if reduction,

“ fresh from the chisel,"-even there no man dwells; Shortly after the propagation of Christianity, Idu it is given by lot to birds, and beasts, and reptiles; it mæa, and more especially Petra, laid aside the idols is a "court for owls," and scarcely are they ever which they and their fathers had hitherto ignorantly frayed from their " lonely habitation" by the tread worshipped, and embraced the gospel of Christ. of a solitary traveller from a far distant land, among Many persecuted Christians found an asylum there, deserted dwellings and desolated ruins.'-Sime's Sa which they could obtain in no other spot of the cred Geog.And see 'HEROD,' Scrip. Illus.' p. 31. Roman dominions. Petra, indeed, became a metro- BEYOND JORDAN-see "Scrip. Illus.' p. 200, and politan see, to which several bishopricks were attached & xviii. p. 118.-TYRE AND SIDON—see xlv.

THE SANCTIFIED CHRISTIAN WILL CHOOSE THE GREATEST OF SORROWS BEFORE HE WILL COMMIT THE LEAST OF SINS.

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ON JESUS' FIRST PARTIAL CIRCUIT,' p. 200 In consequence of the conspiracy, (Sect. xxv. pp., one of that description which Josephus shews to have 1964.9) which, notwithstanding its secresy, was known been abundantly numerous on the lake of Tiberias; to our Saviour by his supernatural discernment of so much so that on a certain occasion he himself the thoughts, St. Matthew, exemplifying the fulfil speedily collected together as many as two hundred ment of prophecy (Is. xlii. 1-4) in the meek and and thirty-each of which required at least four perinoffensive demeanour of the Christ, relates that he sons to man it, was capable of carrying sixteen or withdrew from thence, followed by the multitudes, more with ease: so that our Saviour, and his usual and healing them all. St. Mark is more explicit, and attendants, when those became the twelve apostles, shews that he retired in the direction of the lake, and would constitute about their ordinary complement. that the place of his abode during his absence was The purpose for which this vessel was retained proves the vicinity of the lake, oh. iii. 7-12, p. 200.

that it was not wanted at all times, but only occasion• To this absence, then, I think we may assign the

ally; that is, when the importunity of the people, duration of a partial circuit, now begun, but cou

bringing their sick friends, or infirm persons of any fined to the neighbourhood of the lake, which yet kind, to press upon our Lord, became too great. might occupy the time until the arrival of the next This circuit, then, would extend along the land of feast of Pentecost, May 19, a period, at the utmost, of Gennesaret towards the extremity of the lake. only five weeks, or a month. For, first, the cause of his In the course of the circuit, Magdala, which as I departure from Capernaum was such as to warrant

conceive lay on the western, or on the south-western the expectation that Jesus would be some time

side of the lake, might be visited ; and among those away; and St. Matthew's application of the prophecy

out of whom demons are said to have been cast, in question to it implies the same thing.

Mary of Magdala, mentioned for the first time not Secondly, the multitudes by which he was at long after (Luke viii. 1, 2, & 30, p. 232.), might be one. tended at the close of the circuit, according to the There is no proof, however, nor any reason to suppose representation of St. Mark, consisting of such num- that our Lord crossed the lake, or passed as yet bers, and from such distant regions, could not be either into Decapolis or into Peræa. assembled about him all at once.

The last event which took place upon it, just beThirdly, the injunetion that a small vessel Toáplov | fore our Lord returned to Capernaum, and probably should constantly be in waiting upon him, apockaprepo when the feast of Pentecost was at hand, was the avrip, specified by the same evangelist also, appears a ordination of the twelve apostles, (Sect. xxvii. p. 206.) decisive intiination that he was all the while in the where St. Luke rejoins St. Mk., though St. Matt. omits

vicinity of the lake of Galilee. The vessel itself was this fact altogether.'-Greswell, Vol. II. pp. 321 .4. 204)

WHOSO DESPISETH THE WORD SHALL BE DESTROYED.-Prov. xiii 13.

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SECTION 27.-(G. 5.)-IMMEDIATELY BEFORE HIS RETURN TO CAPERNAUM, JESUS

PASSES A NIGHT IN PRAYER UPON A CERTAIN MOUNTAIN: IN THE MORNING HE
ORDAINS TWELVE OF HIS DISCIPLES TO BE APOSTLES: HE DESCENDS TO THE
PEOPLE, FROM THE MOUNTAIN, TO HEAL SUCH AS HAD NEED OF HEALING; AND
THEN DELIVERS A SERMON TO HIS DISCIPLES IN THE PRESENCE OF THE MUL-
TITUDE. Matt. x. 2–4. Mark iii. 139. Luke vi. 12-49.-See ADDENDA, p. 211.

INTRODUCTION AND COMPARATIVE VIEW.
Mt.
Mk. iii. 13. Lu. vi. 12. Jesus,

V. & VI. on a mountain, passes the whole night in prayer. Mt. vi. 1-18, and 1934. To these, the two cen

tral portions of 'The Sermon on the Mount,' we have - iii. 13.5. vi. 13. In the

no parallel in The Sermon in the Plain.' morning he calls unto him his disciples; and of

VII. them he chooses twelve, to be with him, and that he

- vii. 1-6. Lu. vi. 37-42. Judge not,' &c. might make them apostles, by sending them forth to

Here there is rather an enlargement in Luke, as preach, with the seal of a Divine mission.

| where it is intimated that pride, or seeking to be - X. 2-4. iii. 169. vi. 14-.6. The above our Master, and not seeking to be perfect like names of the twelve apostles, beginning with Simon him in mercy, is that which incapacitates from being Peter, and ending with Judas Iscariot, the traitor- of service to our brethren. See ADDENDA, p. 213, The Twelve.'

VIII. vi. 17-9. Jesus

- vil. 7–14. To this, the eighth division of The comes down from the mountain, and stands with the

Sermon on the Mount' there is no parallel in Luke. company of his disciples, and the multitude, in the

IX. plain; where many that are diseased and vexed with - vii. 15-20. Lu. vi. 435. The case of bear. unclean spirits, come to him, and are healed.

ing true witness is here, in both, compared to a good

tree bringing forth good fruit. In Luke there is the - vi. 20—49. Jesus

farther comparison of a good man out of the good delivers his sermon in the plain; which, like that on

treasure of his heart bringing forth that which is the mount, begins with pronouncing blessing upon good. The warning against false prophets, and that the poor; and ends with the contrast of building against those who hold the truth in unrighteousness, upon the Rock, and building upon the earth or sand.

| may be implied, but are not expressed in this part of With this likeness there is a striking dissimilarity in

Luke, the two discourses; the more central parts of The Sermon on the Mount' being wanting in The Ser. - vii. 21-7. vi. 46-9. In this last division mon in the Plain,' thus

of each of the two sermons, containing the contrast of 1.

building upon the Rock and upon the earth, there is Mt. v. 3-12. Lu. vi. 20—3. In Luke there are four

some difference to be noted,-as where, in Luke, our Beatitudes, the first and last of which are like the

Lord speaks of coming to HIM: coming to Christ is first and last of those in Matthew; but there are only

coming to the Rock ; and then, by hearing his say

ingg and doing them, we build upon Him. It is two intervening in the one case, while there are seven

also, in Luke, intimated that we must dig deep in in the other. In Luke, however, there are, ver. 24-.6, in contrast to the four Beatitudes, four Woes, to whicla

order to lay the foundation. The building must not there is no direct parallel in The Sermon on the

only be fitted for trial, but for standing the severest

test, the stream beating vehemently.' Mount.' II. & III.

Thus, although preserving the same general order - v. 13–.6, and 17–20. To these, the second and as the Sermon on the Mount, the Sermon in the third portions of The Sermon on the Mount,' there Plain is neither an exact copy, nor a synopsis of the is nothing directly parallel in The Sermon in the other, but rather an elucidation of particular porPlain,

tions. It may be regarded as a protest, in the face of IV.

the people, against the conduct of his disciples, - v.3848. Lu. vi. 27-36. Of the latter portion should they ever fall into Mammon-worship, disreof the fourth division of The Sermon on the gard of the poor, uncharitableness, lording it over Mount,' on the subject of loving our enemies, &c., each other, or pretending that they had other creis an enlargement in 'The Sermon in the Plain,' ex- dentials for their office than those exhibited in the planatory, in some measure, of the former-shewing, truth of their doctrines and holiness of their lives, for example, in what it is we are to be perfect like and in the undeniable evidences of Divine power our heavenly Father; it is in shewing mercy-comp. accompanying their ministry: the two former were Mt. v. 48, with Lu. vi. 36.

indispensable.

X.

EVENING, AND MORNING, AND AT NOON, WILL I PRAY, AND CRY ALOUD: AND HE SHALL HEAR MY VOICE.-Psalm lv. 17.

I WILL PRAISE THEE, O LORD, AMONG THE PEOPLE: I WILL SING UNTO THEE AMONG THE NATIONS.Psalm Ivii. 9.

13

No. 27. Jesus passes the night in prayer upon a certain mountain.--N. of Capernaum.

MARK iii. 13–.9.

LUKE vi. 124.6. [Ch. vi. 11, & xxv. p. 198. "And it-came-to-pass in 12

those days, And he-goeth-up

that he-went-out into a mountain,

into a mountain to-pray, and continued all-night

ην διανυκτερευων

in prayer to God.
SCRIPTURE ILLUSTRATIONS.
Lu. vi. 12. into a mountain to pray-See other instances, Lu. iii. 21, § 8, p. 59.

NOTES Lu. vi. 12. Continued all night in prayer, Sc. is undoubted; while passing the night in prayer, withOn the interpretation of TV pogov xö TOÙ Osoll there out going to an oratory, was a common act of Jewish has been some difference of opinion. The ancients, devotion. Our Lord's very object in going was to pray, and most moderns, take it to mean, prayer to God;' and on this, an occasion of great moment, the comwhile some of the early modern commentators, and mon interpretation is decidedly to be preferred. By others of the more recent ones, maintain that it sig. I prayer must here be understood, not prayer alone, nifles in the proseucha, or oratory of God.' That I but that holy meditation and devout thoughtfulness there were Jewish places of worship called upogevrai, so suitable to precede and follow prayer.]

PRAY TO THY FATHER WHICH IS IN SECRET.-Matt. vi. 6.

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WITHHOLD NOT GOOD FROM THEM TO WHOM IT IS DUE, WHEN IT IS IN THE POWER OF THINE HAND TO DO IT.- Prov. iii. 27.

In the morning Jesus ordains twelve of his disciples to be apostles.
MATT. X. 24.
MARK ii. 13–.9.

LUKE vi. 13–.6.
[Ch, x. 1, 2 xxxix. p. 294.]

and

* And when it was day, 13 calleth-unto him

he-called-unto him

his disciples : 6
bwhom he would:
and they came unto him.
14 And he-ordained

cand of them he-chose
erroinde twelve,

EKREFUuevos twelve,
whom also he-named

apostles αποστολους;
d that they should-be with
him, and that he-might-send

them -forth atooten to-
15 preach, and to-have power
ecovoiav to-heal sicknesses,

and to-cast-out devils : 2 Now the names of the twelve apostles are these; The-first, Simon,

and Simon

Simon, who is called

be-surnamed

(whom he-also-named
Peter,
Peter;

Peter,) &
S and Andrew his brother ; h

and Andrew his brother, James the son of Zebedee, 17 kand James the son of Zebedee,

James
and John his brother;
and John the brother

and John,
of James; and he-surnamed
them Boanerges, which is,

The-sons of-thunder:

SCRIPTURE ILLUSTRATIONS. 13. chose_'Ye have not chosen me, but I have are written, 'the names of the twelve tribes of the chosen you,' Jno. xv. 16, § 87 - witnesses chosen children of Israel,' so in the twelve foundations are before of God,' Ac. X. 41.

the names of the twelve apostles of the Lamb,' Rev.

Ixxi. 124. But it is to be observed that the twelve tuelve--correspondent to the twelve tribes of Israel, apostles are not the twelve foundations, any more Mt. xix. 28, $75 - As on the gates of the heavenly city than the children of Israel are the twelve gates.

NOTES. 13. His disciples. A disciple is a scholar, one that monly the title is given to persons who were sent by learns from a master, Jno. ix. 28, $ 55. In the him Paul, an apostle, (not of men, neither by man, gospel, it generally signifies the twelve apostles, who but by Jesus Christ, and God the Father, who raised learned under Jesus Christ as their master; but in him from the dead,) 'Gal. i. 1- Am I not an apostle? the Acts and Epistles, it signifies any follower of am I not free! have I not seen Jesus Christ our Christ, who is careful to learn his truth.

Lord I are not ye my work in the Lord ?' I Co. ix. l. Mk. iii. 14. He ordained. Trongs. Literally, he

See ADDENDA, p. 213, The twelve Apostles.' made, admitted or adopted.-See p. 211, ADDENDA.

Mk. iii. 14. Send them forth. They were first to

be with him as disciples (learners), and then to be (15. To have power. This is the grand distinction

| apostles, or persons sent forth, communicating to between the miraculous powers of Christ and those

others the knowledge of what Jesus did and taught. of his apostles. The one was inherent in himself, the

Chosen to be witnesses, they were first to see and hear, other was expressly communicated by him, and was

and then to testify of what they had seen and heard. never employed but as his power.]

17. Sons of thunder. Thunder appears to be most To have power, etc. In evidence of their extra

1 frequently used in the New Testament to express a ordinary mission, they were qualified to benefit men

loud and hearty acclamation-see Rev. vi. I, And I in an extraordinary manner with regard to both the

| savo when the Lamb opened one of the seals, and I body and the soul. Their power was, however, not en

heard, as it were the noise of thunder, one of the four tirely at their own command, but immediately in the

beasts saying, Come and see-xiv. 2, And I heard a hands of God-he making use of them when and

voice from heaven, as the voice of many waters, and as how he chose. Nor was the power with the twelve

the voice of a great thunder: and I heard the voice of exclusively, it was equally given to the seventy, Lu.

harpers harping toith their harps-xix. 6. And I X. 9-17, $ 60.

heard as it were the voice of a great multitude, and Lu. vi. 13. Named apostles. An apostle, a mis as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of mighty sionary, messenger, or envoy. The term is applied to thunderings, saying, Alleluia: for the Lord God omJesus Christ, who was God's envoy to save the world: nipotent reigneth.' James and John were not only

Wherefore, holy brethren, partakers of the heavenly | among the most distinguished in giving a response calling, consider the Apostle and High Priest of our pro- to the Saviour's love, but also in sounding forth his fession, Christ Jesus,' He. iii. 1-though more com- praise.]

PRACTICAL REFLECTIONS. (Lu. vi. 12. How necessary it is that God should (Let our wills be joyfully resigned to his, in whatexert his own power, in sending forth those who are ever situation we are called to under Him; whether to declare his truth, may be seen in the fact of our it be as ministering unto others, or as being minisgreat Apostle spending in prayer to God the whole tered unto. To obey is better than sacrifice, and :o night that preceded the appointment of the twelve hearken than the fat of rams,' I Sa. xv. 22.] apostles.]

[Lu. vi. 13. The twelve tribes of Israel had been Let us learn, from the example of Jesus, earnestly scattered abroad, were dead in trespasses and sins, to commit our way unto the Lord, before engaging in and required to be given newness of life, through the any important undertaking, especially with regard power of that word which was to be sent unto them to the spread of his truth.

by the twelve apostles of the Lamb.] Mk. iii. 14. Let the choice of Jesus be attended Mk. iii. 14, .5. The purpose for which the twelve to, in the sending forth of his messengers.]

were chosen was, not that others might be prevented

SAY NOT UNTO TAY NEIGHBOUR, GO, AND COME AGAIN, AND TO-MORROW I WILL GIVE : WHEN THOU HAST IT BY THEE.-Prov. iii. 28.

206)

DO THAT WHICH IS GOOD, AND THOU SHALT HAVE PRAISE.-Rom. xiii. 3.

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SOME WOUND WITH THE ARROWS OF REPROACH THOSE WHOM GOD HAS ONLY CORRECTED WITH THE ROD OF REPROOF.

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THE SCORNER IS CONSUMED, AND ALL THAT WATCH FOR INIQUITY ARE CUT OFF.- Isaiah xxix. 20.

NOTES. Lu. vi. 17. Stood in the plain.-See p. 211, ADDENDA, nifies generally to cast out, both in a civil and On Mt. V.-viii. 1, and Lu. vi. 17-49.'

in a military sense ; i. e., either "to banish," or Tyre and Sidon.-See GeoG. Notice, $ 45, Vol. ii.

"to cashier.” It also signifies “to displace officers,"

or "reject actors." Hence many here assign the 19. Virtue. Healing power.

sense "to reject with scorn and ignominy;" which is 22. When they shall separate you. a popiowou. preferable to the sense "to banish," adopted by This was the first degree of excommunication among Kuinoel, or “to defame," supported by Campbell.'the Jews. May either mean from company, as Gen- Bloomf. May have respect to the greater sort of extiles, or from religious assemblies.

communication, called Shammatha and Cherem,' (Cast out your name, dkBawor. 'Exs4ou sig. I by which a person was devoted to destruction.]

PRACTICAL REFLECTIONS. from coming near Jesus, but that they themselves which he chose his apostles to do: first, manifesting might be more particularly with Him; not that they merey with regard to the bodies of men, and then might impede others in the ministry of the word, unto their souls in the ministry of the word. It is but that they might themselves be sent forth to blessed when precept and example thus accompany preach; not to prevent others from doing good, but each other.] that they might especially be active in delivering from evil both the bodies and the souls of men.

204 ver. We should know that we are so poor, that (As if to impress upon the twelve the necessity of We

we cannot purchase the kingdom of heaven - that being themselves hearers of the word they were to

we must receive it as the free gift of God in Christ declare unto others; and by which hearing, they were

Jesus, after whom, as the Bread of Life, let us hunto become as stones, built upon the Rock Christ; this ber, and so we shall be alled. was written in the names of the very first of the twelve [Let us have a sympathy with his sufferings and -Simon, hearing; and Peter, a stone, See ADD. P. 210.Jl that of his body, and we shall laugh with joy when (Lu. vi. 17-20. Jesus gave an example of that his cause shall fully and for ever triumph.]

HE THAT PATH MERCY ON THE POOR, HAPPY IS HE.-Prov. xiv, 21.

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RECEIVING FROM GOD AND GIVING TO MAN SHOULD GO HAND IN HAND.

SCRIPTURE ILLUSTRATIONS. 24. rich-contrast with poor,' ver. 20 thou in bear rule by their means; and my people love to have thy lifetime receivedst,' &e., Lui. xvi. 25, $ 69—' Goit so: and what will ye do in the end thereof?' Je. to now, ye rich men, weep and howl for your miseries | v. 31. that shall come upon you,' Ja. v. I.

27, .8. Love your enemies, 8c.-- same as Mt. v. 44, 25. are full-contrast with the case of those that

$ 19, p. 128. hunger, ver. 21, p. 207—' Therefore thus saith the 29. smiteth thee, &c.-50 Mt. v. 39, 40, p. 127. Lord God, Behold, my servants shall eat, but ye shall

30. Give to every man-Mt. v. 42, p. 127 be hungry: behold, my servants shall drink, but ye shall be thirsty: behold, my servants shall rejoice, 31. And as ye would, &c. Therefore all things but ye shall be ashamed,' Is. lxv. 13.

| whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do

ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prothat laugh nou-contrast with weep,' ver. 21-' the phets,' Mt. vii. 12, $ 19, p. 139. end of that mirth is heaviness,' Pr. xiv. 13_let your laughter be turned to mourning, and your joy to

32. For if ye love, &c.-comp. with Mt. v. 46, p. 128, heaviness,' Ja. iv. 9.

where reward' is used in place of thank,' and

| publicans' for 'sinners'-Matthew had himself been 26. speak well of you contrast with the case of a publican. those who have their names cast out as evil, for the 33. do good, &c.-while we were yet sinners, Christ Son of man's sake, ver. 22, -3, supra.

died for us,' Ro. v. 8-as the disciples of Jesus, the the false prophets_And the messenger that was same self-sacrifice is required of usFor even heregone to call Micaiah spake unto him, saying, Behold

unto were ye called : because Christ also suffered for now. the words of the prophets declare good untous, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his the king with one mouth: let thy word, I pray thee, steps,' I Pe. ii. 21. be like the word of one of them, and speak that which

34. lend, &c. - from him that would borrow of is good,' I Ki. xxii. 13- This is a rebellious people,

| thee turn not thou away,' Mt. v. 42, $ 19, p. 127. lying children, children that will not hear the law of the LORD: which say to the seers, See not; and to 35. love ye your enemies-It had been shewn how the prophets, Prophesy not unto us right things, speak love was to be manifested to those that sought to inunto us smooth things, prophesy deceits,' Is. *xx. jure us in name and condition, ver. 27, .8, supra, and 9, 10— The prophets prophesy falsely, and the priests as to person and property, ver. 29, 30, supra.

A HEAVY BURDEN MAY BE EASILY BORNE BY THE HELP OF MANY SHOULDERS.

dians.

NOTES. 24. Woe unto you that are rich / How hard is it ance, which more or less continue upon their chilfor them that trust in riches to enter into the kingdom dren to this day. Behold, ye despisers, and wonder, of God l'nay, it is as impossible, as for a camel to go and perish,' Ac. xiii. 41. through the eye of a needle,' Mk. . 24, 5, 75. The scribes were not only greedy of worldly wealth, but

26. When all men shall speak well of you! Such as

seek not to bring men to the truth, but to please all were so confident in their supposed spiritual treasure as to reject the true riches. Their minds were so oc

parties, and for this are willing to confound right and cupied with quibbles about the Law that they could

wrong, and make sinful compliances, like the Heronot attend to the Gospel.

The false prophets. Men who pretended to be of 25. That are full! Those who, like the Pharisees, God, who delivered their own doctrines as the truth were satisfied with the forms of religion connected

of God, and accommodated themselves to the pleasure with the temple service, were soon to be deprived of!

of the court, or the desires of the people. Of this them; and so, sooner or later, will all those be left

number were the prophets of Baal, and the false proempty, whose trust, like theirs, has been in rites and

phets who appeared in the time of Jeremiah, &c. ceremonies.

28. Bless them that curse you. Give those kind That laugh now! Those who made light of the and friendly language who rail against or speak eril call to repentance, and of the warnings of Christ and of you.'--See $ 19, p. 128, Mt. v. 44, Notes." his apostles, who turned even the dying groans of

29. Smiteth. See Mt. v. 39, 40, p. 127, Notes.' the Redeemer into a jest, were soon to be involved in the most fearful calamities, plagues of long continu-l 34. As much again. loa. An equivalent."

PRACTICAL REFLECTIONS. 25..6 rer. Let us beware of being satisfied with the forerunners of woe hereafter ; such, doubtless, having our portion in this life: the very things they will be, should they prevent us from accepting which worldly men account the great good of life the free grace of God to our own souls, & hinder us abundance of riches, fulness of bread, making merry, from ministering to the temporal and spiritual good and having a good name among men, may be only of others.

208]

OUR EVERY ACT OF CHARITY IS BUT AN ACT OF EQUITY.

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