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Matt. viii. 27.
MARK iv. 40,.1.

LUKE viii. 25.
P and said unto-the sea,
Peace, be-still I

Wa TEOLWOO.
And the wind ceased

and they-ceased
eKomadev,

επανσαντο,
and there was a-great calm. and there-was a-great calm. and there was a-calm.

40 And he-said unto-them, And he said unto-them,
Why are-ye so fearful de do?
how is it that ye-have no

Where is your
faith 79

faith?
9 But
the men marvelled," 41 "And they-feared

And they-being-afraid
exceedingly,

wondered, saying,

and said one-to-another, saying one-to-another, What-manner-of man is this, What manner of man is this, What manner of man is this !

for he-commandeth eriTAGOE that even the winds and that even the wind and

even the winds and the sea obey him!

the sea obey him?

water, and they-obey him.

27

SCRIPTURE ILLUSTRATIONS. and there was a calm He maketh the storm a ! the swelling thereof,' &c., Ps. xlvi. 1-3, p. (8) - Fear calm, so that the waves thereof are still. Then are I thou not; for I am with thee,' &c., 1s. xli. 10—4, they glad because they be quiet ; so he bringeth them p. (41). unto their desired haven,' Ps. cvii. 29, 30, p. (79).

Mk. iv. 41. they feared exceedingly God is greatly 25. Where is your faith - Those who have Jesus for to be feared in the assembly of the saints, and to be their guide need not fear; they may sing, 'God is our had in reverence of all them that are about him. refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. 1 O LORD God of hosts, who is a strong LORD like Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be re unto thee? ... Thou rulest the raging of the sea : moved, and though the mountains be carried into when the waves thereof arise, thou stillest them,' the midst of the sea, though the waters thereof roar Ps. lxxxix. 7-9, p. (50)-'even the winds and the sea and be troubled, though the mountains shake with I obey him !' Mt. viii. 27.

HAST THOU NOT KNOWN ? HAST THOU NOT HEARD, THAT THE EVERLASTING GOD, THE LORD, THE CREATOR OF THE ENDS

NOTES. command of our Lord. Standing amidst the howling | cries of the seamen, all by a single word hushed into tempest, on the heaving sea, and in the darkness of calm repose... present an image of power and the night, by his own power he stills the waves, and divinity irresistibly grand and awful. So the tembids the storm subside. What a power was this ! pest rolls and thickens over the head of the awakened What irresistible proof that he was Divine! There sinner. So he trembles over immediate and awful is not, anywhere, a more sublime description of a destruction. So while the storm of wrath howls, and display of power.

hell threatens to engulf him, he comes trembling And there was a great calm. The instantaneous

to the Saviour. The Savicur hears, he rebukes the ness of the perfect calm is a proof of the reality

storm, and the sinner is safe-an indescribable peace

takes possession of the soul- see Is. Ivii. 20,1,a p. (87); of the miracle ; for after a storm, the sea is never

Rom. v. 1;b Ph. iv. 7.c] perfectly smooth, until some time has elapsed. 27. What manner of man is this. The men might |

a... the wicked are like the troubled sea, when well regard our Lord as super-human: since to itill 1l cannot rest, whose waters cast up mire and dirt. the raging of the sea,' was always reckoned among

There is no peace, saith my God, to the wicked.' the operations of God, insomuch that in Ps. lxxxix. b. ...... being justified by faith, we have peace 7see Scrip. Illus.' supra--it forms as it were a with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.' designation of the Deity.

c. And the peace of God, which passeth all under[The darkness, the dashing waves, the howling standing, shall keep your hearts and minds through winds, the heaving and tossing ship, and the fears and Christ Jesus.'

OF THE EARTH, PAINTETH NOT, NEITHER JS WEARY? THERE IS NO SEARCHING OF HIS UNDERSTANDING.-Isaiah xl. 28.

PRACTICAL REFLECTIONS. will prove faithful in upholding us in that which is his mighty power, in stilling the stormy waves-the commanded : Jesus' having said, 'Let us go over to tumults of the people, and in bringing to the desired the other side,' should have been deemed a sufficient haven his tempest-tossed disciples : but in the meanguarantee that the passage, however dangerous, time, let them rest assured, that, whatever the seemwould be accomplished

ing jeopardy, Mk. iv. 39, 40. Let us look to see the greatness of

In safety and comfort their warfare He'll end.'] the danger, with which we may be threatened, result in the greater manifestation of both the will and the

| Mt. viii. 27. Let us rejoice in this, that the dangers power of Jesus to deliver: he had only to rebuke I to which we may be exposed in following Jesus, God the winds and the raging deep, with Peace, be still :' is able to turn to us for a testimony ; those that are the wind ceased, and there was a great calm.'

with us being forced to contemplate the power and

the grace of Him, whom even the winds and the, c. (Let us cry unto Jesus, that soon he may put forth

GEOGRAPHICAL NOTICE.
THE SEA OF GALILEE.— See Sect. xxxii. p. 250.

EVERY NATURAL MAN IS BESIDE HIMSELF.

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THE SLEEP OF A LABOURING MAN IS SWEET, WHETHER HE EAT LITTLE OR MUCH:

ON THE INCIDENTS IN THE WAY, AND ON THE TIME OF CROSSING THE LAKE TO

GERGESA.[See Greswell, Vol. I. Diss. lii. pp. 191–203.] . The next event is the passage of the lake of Gall this might have transpired by the way; and, if oor lee, which we may divide into the incidents on the Saviour was proceeding thither, ... expecting to pass way to the lake- the incidents upon the lake--the the night upon the water, his answer, as now returned. incidents on the other side-and the return : all so would be just as pertinent, and as pathetic as the connected together as to form one entire narrative, same answer, when returned some time after. from Mt. viii. 18-ix. 1, the parts of which will be

The second incident in St. Matthew concerns one, consequently regular, whatever the whole may be.

who was a disciple already-but the similar incident in The incidents on the way to the lake, as here

St. Luke, one, who was then called for the first time: related, are peculiar to St. Matthew, but the same

and there is also this further difference between incidents, or something very like them, are found

them, that, in the one, our Lord is made to reply also at Luke ix. 57, ($ 59,) to the end-at a very dif

merely, 'Ακολούθει μοι" και άφες τους νεκρούς θάψαι τους ferent time, and on a very different occasion. These davray expous. (Mt. viii. 22)—but not xù di drwy incidents, in St. Matthew, are the request of a certain duayyeria Thy Basilsíay toû Osoù, (Lu. ix. 60, 8 59.)... scribe to follow our Saviour; and the petition of one,

St. Mark and St. Luke have each given (Mk. iv. 35. who was a disciple, for leave to go and bury his father : to which St. Luke adds a third, of a nature 7.1.20; Lu. vill. 22–39) an history of a passage

I of the lake, attended with similar incidents: the lat 15 akin to the last. The occasions to which these disor tinct accounts would belong are palpably the most

ter of which is clearly ascertained to be the same different imaginable ; our Lord, in St. Matthew,

with the former and this is fixed by the account being about to cross the lake, and in St. Luke, on a

itself to the evening of the day when our Lord began journey through Samaria. ... With regard to St.

to teach in parables. Now this he did, posterior to a Luke, such a trajection would be a singular circum

second circuit of Galilee ; and that, a circuit under

taken after the cure of the centurion's servant. The stance, and altogether at variance with his extreme

beginning to teach in parables St. Matthew records, accuracy, and his scrupulous regard to historical

xiii. 1. ($ 32, p. 242 :) the cure of the centurion's serprecision.....

vant he recorded, viii. 5, ($ 28, p. 218.) The passage Such declarations of the willingness of individuals of the lake, then, between the two, may be regular to become disciples might often be made, especially as to what goes before, but it is irregular as to what at the outset of our Saviour's ministry; and, if they follows after. Nor is there any means of evading were the effect of a forward or mistaken zeal, they this conclusion, except by denying the authority of might as often be by him repressed. Besides, st.

St. Mark, whose note of time, iv. 35, fixes the pasMatthew calls his applicant a scribe, and makes him

sage to the evening in question; or, by contending style our Lord, Master-St. Luke calls his merely a | that his passage, or St. Luke's, was a different event certain person, who addresses Jesus by the common from St. Matthew's. But that this cannot be the title of respect, Kúpe. Now the rank or profession of case, may be inferred from certain particulars comscribe among the Jews was much more considerable | mon to the accounts of all, and of so critical a pature than we are apt to imagine; and the readiness of one

as necessarily to characterize only the same event. of that order to have become a disciple of Jesus was

These are& still more remarkable event; and St. Luke, I am persuaded, had the nature of the case required it, I

First, the motive which induced our Lord to cross especially in the last year of our Lord's ministry,

the lake ; viz., the presence of the multitude, Mt. when the scribes and Pharisees almost universally had

viii. 18, p. 264. determined on his rejection-would not have failed Secondly, the storm upon the lake. to designate him accordingly. Capernaum was not so contiguous to the lake, but that such an incident as

*Thirdly, the miracle at the other side.'

BUT THE ABUNDANCE OF THE RICH WILL NOT SUFFER HIM TO SLEEP.-Eccles. v. 12.

SECTION 35.-(G. 20.) JESUS LANDS IN THE COUNTRY OF THE GADARENES,

AND CASTS DEVILS OUT OF TWO MEN WHO LIVED AMONG THE TOMBS. THE
PEOPLE OF THE CITY AND NEIGHBOURHOOD REQUEST JESUS TO DE PART OUT OF
THEIR COASTS. JESUS RETURNS TO CAPERNAUM.* Matt. viii. 28-34 : ix.1. Mark .
1-21. Luke viii. 26–40.-EAST OF THE SEA OF GALILEE, AND WEST OF THE SAME.

INTRODUCTION AND ANALYSIS. Mt. viii. 28. Mk. v. 1–5. Lu. viii. 26, .7. Jesus Mt. viii. 34. Mk. v. 14, .5. Lu. viii. 35. The peohaving arrived in the country of the Gadarenes, is ple go out to see the truth of the matter, and coming immediately met by two possessed with devils, ex- to Jesus, find the man who had been possessed ceedingly fierce and untameable. Mark and Luke'clothed, and in his right mind.' They are afraid. mention only one, but Matthew, as is his custom,

- viii. 34. - v. 16, .7. notices both.

viii. 36, 7. Having

been told all, the Gadarenes beseech Jesus to depart - viii. 29. - v. 6,7. - viii. 28. They cry

out of their coasts.' out, confessing him to be the Saviour, and the Son of the most high God.' 'The devils believe, and

- v. 18, .9. - viii. 38, .9. He that tremble.'

had been possessed by Legion' requests permission to - v. 8–10. - viii. 29–31. Jesus

accompany Jesus, who bids him first return, and at having commanded the legion to depart, the devils

home among his friends prove the reality of the beseech him not to send them into the abyss."

change which had happened to him, and to speak of

the cause thereof-the compassion of the Lord, - viii. 30 . 2. -- v. 11.3. - viii. 32, .3. Jesus grants them their request they enter into the herd

- v. 20.

viii. 39. The man of swine,' which immediately rush into the sea, and departs, and publishes throughout Decapolis what are drowned.

Jesus had done for him. - viii. 33. - v. 14. - viii. 34. Those - ix. 1. - v. 21. - vili. 40. Jesus rethat have bad the care of the swine flee into the city, turns by ship to Capernaum, where many are rathered and spread also in the country the news of Jesus' together waiting for him, and they gladly receive arrival, and of what had occurred to the swine.

him. * See p. 275, ADDENDA, On healing the demoniacs at Gergesa'--and Greswell, Vol. II. pp. 335 .8 | On Jesus passing the night on the lake.'

beste heren and probitants

roughout being the heat

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(G. 20,) No. 35. Jesus lands in the country of the Gadarenes, and casts devils out of two

men who lived among the tombs.-East of the sea of Galilee. MATT. viii. 28–33.

MARK v. 1-14,

LUKE viii. 26–34. 28 And when-he-was-come 1 "And they came over

And they-arrived at 26 to the other-side

unto the other-side

of-the sea,
into the country of the
into the country of the

the country of-the
Gergesenes,
Gadarenes.

Gadarenes,

o which is over-againstGalilee. 2 And when he:-was-come And when he:-went- 27 out of the ship, immediately

forth to land,
there-met him
there-met him

there-met him
out-of the toinbs

out-of the city two possessed-with

a-man with an.

a-certain man, which had
devils,
unclean spirit,

devils
long time, and ware no

clothes,
coming-out of the 3 who had his dwelling neither abode in any house,
tombs,
among the tombs;

but in the tombs.
Cexceeding fierce xaletou
Nav, so-that no man might
LO XUELV pass by that way.d

d and no-man could bind him, no-not
4 with-chains : because that-he had-been-

often -bound with-fetters and chains, and
the chains had been-plucked-asunder
dLeonaga by him, and the fetters
broken-in-pieces OUVTETPI dai: neither
5 could noxve any man tame him. And

always, night and day, he was in the
mountains, and in the tombs, crying,

HE CAN NEVER TRULY RELISH THE SWEETNESS OF GCD'S MERCY, WHO NEVER TASTED THE BITTERNESS OF HIS OWN MISERY.

SCRIPTURE ILLUSTRATIONS. Mk. r. 1. Gadarenes-Gadara was the principal Matthew is remarkable for presenting the double city of the district. Josephus, in his Wars of the throughout his whole history-see Mt. xx. 30, $ 79, Jews,' b. iv. c. vii. s. 3, calls Gadara' the metropolis 'two blind men,' and parallels-It may be noticed, of Perea: by this name, well known to the Gentiles, that Matthew often mentions together the two Jewish Mark and Luke denominate the country over against sects, the Pharisees and Sadducees,' and often also Galilee'-comp. Mk. v. 1, and Lu. viii. 26, with Mt. 'the scribes and Pharisees.' viii. 28-in the latter passage we read country of 3. had his dwelling among the tombs-Luke speaks the Gergesenes,' Gergesa being probably the nearer of the man as 'out of the city,' but also clearly de. country town, and well enough known to the Jews, clares that he abode not in any house, but in the for whom, more immediately, Matthew wrote-see

tombs, ver. 27. GeoG. NOTICE, p. 274; and ADDENDA, P. 275, Greswell.

4. because that he had been often bound, fc.-this 2. when he was come out of the ship--Matthew had

appears to have been the case of that one of the two, said, . When he was come to the other side,' ver. 28

who is particularly noticed by Mark and Luke-the Luke says, When he went forth to land,' ver. 27

'certain man, which had devils long time'- he was -the repulse was immediately' upon attempting to

kept bound with chains and in fetters; and he brake enter the country, Mk. v. 2-comp. with what our

the bands,' &c., Lu, viii. 27-9--they were both 'exLord had said, Mt. viii. 20, $ 34, p. 265.

ceeding fierce, so that no man might pass by that way,' out of the tombs-which, it would appear, were very Mt. viii. 28. near to the city-comp. with Lu. viii. 27, supra.

5. he was in the mountains, and in the tombs, &c.a man with an unclean spirit-Matthew intimates and was driven of the devil into the wilderness,' Lu. that there met him two possessed with devils,' viii. 29, p. 271-a like infatuation besets those which ver. 28-probably the certain man, which had devils remain among the graves, and lodge in the monulong time,' may have taken the lead, Lu. ver. 27- ments,' Is. lxv. 4.

IF SINNERS CAST NOT AWAY THEIR SINS FOR GOD'S SAKE ; GOD WILL CAST THEM AWAY FOR THEIR SINS' SAKE.

NOTES. Mt. viii. 28. The country of the Gergesenes.-See mátwv kviots, kai rois rápois Ivduatpliwr, we find that Scrip. Illus.' supra, and GEOG. NOTICE, p. 274. they were sometimes used as places of abode-see

Mk. v. 3. His dwelling among the tombs ......... Is. lxv. 4, Scrip. Illus,' supra. The tombs in ques..... The tombs of the ancients, especially in the tion were doubtless hypogcea, caverns cut out of the east, were tolerably roomy vaults, and would be no mountains, similar to those at Telmessus and Petra; indifferent shelter for the houseless, or such poor and which, as we learn from travellers, still remain, wretches as demoniacs or lepers, driven from human and form at the present day habitations for the livhabitations. Indeed, from Diog. Laert. ix. 38, &pn- ing.'-Bloomfield.

PRACTICAL REFLECTIONS. (Lu. viii. 26, .7. Jesus was willing to minister, not represent the present condition of the inhabitants only west of the sea of Galilee, where there were of that region ! they are destitute of proper covering, people to hear him gladly, but in the inhospitable and literally dwelling in tomhs; and also exceeding country towards the east, where no welcome awaited fierce, so that the great thoroughfares between the west him, but where immediately a legion of devils came and the east have been for a long time deserted.] to oppose him.)

[Mk. v. 3-6. It is also true, that no human means [Mt. viii. 28. How aptly the men here spoken of have been effectual to bind them, and Greek and

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THE CHRISTIAN BELIRVRS BEAVEN TO BE GOD'S DWELLING PLACE; YET BELIEVES THAT THE HEAVEN OP UKAVRNS CANNOT CONTAIN HIM.

SCRIPTURE ILLUSTRATIONS. Mk. 4.5. cutting himself with stones—the like mad. I adjure thee by God the like form of expression, Dess characterised the worshippers of Baal- They the high priest made use of, when adjuring Jesus to cried aloud, and cut themselves after their manner declare whether he were the Son of God, which the with knives and lancets, till the blood gushed out upon very devils here confessed - see Mt. xxvi. 63, § 89, them.' I KL xviii. 28-Dor have the monks, who lodge I adjure thee by the living God, that thou tell as in the monuments, been free from such things, 'which whether thou be the Christ, the Son of God.' things have indeed a shew of wisdom in will worship, and humility, and neglecting of the body; not in any

| torment me not—'Art thou come hither to torment honour to the satisfying of the flesh,' Col ii. 23.

us before the time ? Mt. viii. 29For those who look 6. ran and worshipped him fell down before him,' | to their own wilful offerings for sin, after having reLu. viii. 28_here was a true representation of the ceived the knowledge of the one true sacrifice, there infatuation described, Is. xxix. 13, p. (81), and re remaineth no more sacrifice for sins, but a certain ferred to by our Lord, This people draweth nigh fearful looking for of judgment and fiery indignaunto me with their mouth, and honoureth me with tion, which shall devour the adversaries, He. X. 26. their lips : but their beart is far from me. But in 7-comp. with ver. 9-14. vain they do worship me,' &e., Mt. w. 8, 9, $ 14.

7. of the most high God Son of God,' Mt. viii. 29 8 . Come out of the man- see Lu. viii. 29see also Son of God most high,' La, viii. 28-see NOTE. Mk. i. 23, & 17, p. 111; ix. 25, $ 51.

THE CARISTIAN BELIEVKS GOD SHEWS MERCY EVEN WHEN HE EXECUTES JUSTICE: AND THAT HE EXECUTUS JUSTICE WHEN HE SHEWS MERCY.

NOTES. Mkv. 5. Culling himself with stones. This is not do with peace?' 2 Ki. ix. 18, .9. David said, What well rendered cutting. The kata is highly intensive; hare I to do with you, ye sons of Zeruiah?' 2 Sa. KaTaKb Tu answering to the Latin concidere, and xvi. 10.- See also Ezr. iv. 3; and Jno. ii. 4. SII, p. 77. meaning to cut up, to hack and heu. In which sense

1 (Mk. v.7. The most high God. eco Toù iliotou. The the word occars, both in the Septuagint and the epithet ó Bhotos, as applied to God, occurs nowhere else classical writers.' This circumstance of cutting him in the Gospels, and only once elsewhere in the New self with sharp stones, instead of a knife, (which, of Testament, i. e., He. vii. I, " For this Melchisedec, course, would not be granted him,) is quite in the

king of Salem, priest of the most high God, who met manner of maniacs: who often tear their flesh, and Abraham returning from the slaughler or the kings. cut it with whatever they can lay their hands upon.' and blessed him;" taken from Gen. xiv. 18_22. It - Bloomfeld.)

corresponds to the Hebrew 179 by. The appellations Mt. viii. 29. What have we to do with thee. huiy seem to have been at first given with reference to the cal gol. An idiom frequent both in Hellenistic and exalted abode of God, 1. e., in heaven- see Is. lxvi. I. Classical Greek. ... The sense of the phrase varies P. (15). They may also refer to the supreme majesty with the context; but it usually impiies troublesome of the Deity. Hence in the Old Testament 775y is or unauthorised interference. Here it seems to be,

| almost always used to distinguish the true God from " What hast thou to do with us, what authority hast thou over us?"-Ibid.

those who were called gods.'- Bloomfield.]

[I adjure thee by God. This formula usually deThe phrase often occurs in the Old Testament, as notes to put any one on his oath-see Note on Mt xxvi. signifying an abrupt refusal of some request, or a 63, § 89. But here (as Grotius, Rosenm., and Kuinoel wish not to be troubled with the company or impor. have shewn) it has the force of oro, obtestor te per tunity of others. Jehu said to the messengers who Deum, and thus is equivalent to the diopal cou of Lu. were sent by Joram to meet him, What hast thou to viii. 28.' - Ibid. 1

PRACTICAL REFLECTIONS. Roman civilization were in vain made use of to tame (It is not every prayer which is acceptable to God, them. Their fetters have been broken in pieces, and even where there is acknowledgment of the truth, busy have they been in the work of self-destruction, that Jesus is the Son of the most high God'-A as well as in seeking to injure those who might seek man may by the devil be urged to pray for peace to pass by that way.

while in his sins, or the deferring of punishment on 6, 7 ver. How miserable the condition of those who

account of them. Let us pot confound the fear of seek to have peace in rejection of Jesus !

torment, (which even the unclean spirit may proLet us pot merely, like the man with an unclean duce,) with the fear of offending God, and the desire spirit, bow to the power of the Son of the most high l of holiness. 1 God, but rejoice to meet our most gracious Deliverer.

270)

CHRIST IS THE SURETY OF THE COVENANT OF GRACE.

MATT. viii. 30—2.

MARK v. 9–13.

Luke viii. 30—.2. chains and in-fetters; and he-brake diapproow the bands, and-was-driven ndav

veto of the devil into the wilderness.) And he-asked him,

And Jesus asked him, 30

saying,
What is thy name?

What is thy name?
And he-answered, saying,

And he said,
My name is Legion:

Legion :
for we-are many.

because many devils

were-entered into him. 10 And he-besought him much And they-bеsought him 31 that he-would- not:

that he-would- not:send--them -away

command them to-goout-of the country.

out into the deep

apuogov. 11 Now there-was there

And there was there 32

30 ! And there was
a-good-way-off from them?

an-herd of-many swine

feeding.

Inigh-unto the mountains
a-great herd of-swine

feeding.
12 And all the devils

besought him, saying,"

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an-herd of-many swine

feeding
on the mountain :

and they-
besought him

that he-wouldsuffer them to-enter

into them.

Send us

into the swine,
"that we-may-enter into them.
13 And forth with Jesus

gave-them -leave.

And he said unto

them, Go.

And hesuffered them.

WICKED MEN HAVE A RIGHT TO USE THE CREATURES; BUT ONLY GODLY MEN MAKE A RIGHT USE OF THEM.

SCRIPTURE ILLUSTRATIONS. . Mk. v. 9. Legion, &c. --because many devils were en-30; Lu. viii. 32—'they were about two thousand,' tered into him,' Lu. viii. 30, supra-like the church in Mk. v. 13, p. 272. which has been the predicted falling away, 2 Th. ii.

1 12. all the devils besought him-each of the three 3_12_Babylon the great is fallen, is fallen, and is

evangelists here clearly identifies these spiritual agenbecome the habitation of devils, and the hold of every

cies, as not being mere qualities of either mind or foul spirit, and a cage of every unclean and hateful

matter, but as having an existence distinct from that bird,' Rev. xviii. 2—which however is not to be cleans of the creatures they inhabited-they had before ed, but destroyed And I heard another voice from entered the man, Lu. viii. 30—and afterward they heaven, saying, Come out of her, my people, that ye

went out of the man, and entered into the swine, be not partakers of her sins, and that ye receive not var. 33 p. 272. of her plagues,' ver. 4. 10. out of the country-or, out into the deep,' Lu.

13. Jesus gave them leave-here we see that the viii. 31-into the abyss, or "bottomless pit,' into which

prayers even of devils may be granted-it was no Satan is to be cast, and where he is to be shut up,

sign that God approved of the Israelites when he gave that he may deceive the nations no more, till the

them that which they lusted after, Ps. cvi. 14, 15 thousand years ... be fulfilled,' Rev. xx. 3.

Jesus in merey may deny our requests—Ye ask, and

receive not, because ye ask amiss, that ye may conJl. nigh unto the mountains-or, top of the hill'

sume it upon your lusts,' Ja. iv. 3 Fret not thyself or, far up on the mountain,' Lu. viii. 32-a good because of him who prospereth in his way, because way off from them,' Mt. viii. 30.

of the man who bringeth wicked devices to pass, a great herd-or, 'an herd of many,' &c., Mt. viii. | Ps. xxxvii. 7.

WE RUN FROM GOD BY SIN TO DEATH, AND CAN ONLY RETURN TO GOD BY DYING TO SIN.

NOTES. Mt, viii. 29. Before the time. A time determined and fields. The Scythians, Arabs, and Egyptians, by the Divine Judge.

had an aversion to swine. The Jewish law stated

them to be unclean animals, Le. xi. 7-see also Is. Mk. v. 9. Legion. A Roman legion consisted of

Ixvi. 3, p. (15); and the Jews so abhorred swine that, many, though its number was not always aiike. it is said, they would not name them. Some make it 6666, and others as much as 12,500. Being many, the Jews used it to signify that term.

Mk. v. 10. Not send them away out, c. The demons

entreat that if they must depart from the man, Mt. viii. 30. Many swine. See on ver. 33, p. 272.

they may at least not be compelled to leave the Swine. Well-known animals of a ravenous kind:

country i which was but another form of preferring

the first-mentioned request, that he would not send they feed on carrion, husks, and such like vile pro

them away to the place of torment. vision: nay, some of them eat their own young, after they have brought them forth. They look towards, Lu. viii. 31. Into the deep. Bus tnv aßvocoy. That and dig in the earth, & wallow in mire ; by exces the sea is not meant here is evident ; for to the sea sive wallowing, or dancing, or carrying of straw to the demons went of themselves, when permitted, at their sty, they presage bad weather, they are very their own request, to enter into the swine.See lazy and sleepy, and no less mischievous to gardens ADDENDA, p. 274, Into the deep.'

PRACTICAL REFLECTIONS. 7, 8 ver. Let us beware of being so led away of the Lu. viii. 30. He who refuses obedience to the one devil, as to suppose that Jesus comes only to cause true God, who alone can lead us aright, and truly unhappiness. Let our lives be so, as that we can bless us, makes himself the prey of a legion, whose look forward to Christ's coming with joyful hope, and delight is in making him an instrument of mischief not with dread and despondency.

to himself and others.

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