The Ancient History of the Egyptians, Carthaginians, Assyrians, Medes and Persians, Grecians and Macedonians, Volume 4

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Page 30 - I honour and love you ; but I shall choose rather to obey God than you, and to my latest breath shall never renounce my philosophy, nor cease to exhort and reprove you, according to my custom, by telling- each of you, when you come in my way, My good friend and citizen of the most famous city in the world for wisdom and...
Page 15 - He had no open school, like the rest of the philosophers, nor set times for his lessons. He had no benches prepared, nor ever mounted a professor's chair. He was the philosopher of all times and seasons. He taught in all places, and upon all occasions. In walking...
Page 42 - ... bathed, lest they should be polluted by touching it; which drove them into such despair, that many of them killed themselves. The Athenians, not contented with having punished his accusers, caused a statue of brass to be erected to him, of the workmanship of the celebrated Lysippus, and placed it in one of the most conspicuous parts of the city.
Page 30 - Delium, the fear of death should at this time make me abandon that in which the Divine Providence has placed me, by commanding me to pass my life in the study of philosophy, for the instruction of myself and others, this would be a most criminal desertion indeed, and make me highly worthy of being cited before this tribunal as an impious man, who does not believe the gods. " Should you resolve to acquit me ; for the future, I should not hesitate to make answer...
Page 29 - ... of their sons, brothers, and nephews. But these are the persons who take upon them my defence, and interest themselves in the success of my cause. " Pass on me what sentence you please, Athenians; but I can neither repent nor change my conduct ; I must not abandon or suspend a function which God himself has imposed on me.
Page 199 - ... and saluted and embraced each other with great joy and serenity in their looks; whilst the others kept themselves close in their houses, or, if necessity obliged them to go abroad, it was with a sadness and dejection of aspect which sensibly expressed their profound anguish and affliction. That difference was still more remarkable in the women. Grief, silence, tears, distinguished those who expected the return of their sons ; but...
Page 31 - He does not swear to discharge with impunity whom he pleases ; but to do justice where it is due. We ought not therefore to accustom you to perjury, nor you to suffer yourselves to be accustomed to it ; for in so doing...
Page 42 - Here, said they, he formed our youth, and taught our children to love their country, and to honour their parents. In this place, he gave us his admirable lessons, and sometimes...
Page 39 - When the dead are arrived at the fatal rendezvous of departed souls, whither their daemon! conducts them, they are all judged. Those who have passed their lives in a manner neither entirely criminal nor absolutely innocent, are sent into a place where they suffer pains proportioned to their faults, till being purged and cleansed of their guilt, and afterwards restored to liberty, they receive the reward of the good actions they have done in the body.
Page 35 - ... the guilt of innocent blood ? but, if all these motives cannot alter him, and he is not concerned in regard to himself, can he be insensible to the interests of his children ? In what...

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