A Manual of British & Irish History: Illustrated with Maps, Engravings, and Statistical, Chronological, & Genealogical Tables

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T. Jones, 1847 - Great Britain - 936 pages
 

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Page 713 - IT was a' for our rightfu' King, We left fair Scotland's strand ; It was a' for our rightfu' King We e'er saw Irish land, My dear ; We e'er saw Irish land. Now a' is done that men can do, And a...
Page 415 - Had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, He would not have given me over in my grey hairs.
Page 845 - I am going to my cold and silent grave: my lamp of life is nearly extinguished: my race is run: the grave opens to receive me, and I sink into its bosom! I have but one request to ask at my departure from this world, — it is the charity of its silence! Let no man write my epitaph: for as no...
Page 778 - Taxation is no part of the governing or legislative power. The taxes are a voluntary gift and grant of the Commons alone. In legislation, the three estates of the realm are alike concerned ; but the concurrence of the Peers and the Crown to a tax, is only necessary to close with the form of a law. The gift and grant is of the Commons alone.
Page 841 - By the festal cities' blaze, While the wine-cup shines in light ! And yet, amidst that joy and uproar, Let us think of them that sleep, Full many a fathom deep, By thy wild and stormy steep, Elsinore...
Page 841 - Again! again! again! And the havoc did not slack, Till a feeble cheer the Dane To our cheering sent us back; Their shots along the deep slowly boom: Then ceased — and all is wail, As they strike the shattered sail; Or in conflagration pale Light the gloom.
Page 845 - My Lords, you are impatient for the sacrifice - the blood which you seek is not congealed by the artificial terrors which surround your victim; it circulates warmly and unruffled, through the channels which God created for noble purposes, but which you are bent to destroy, for purposes so grievous, that they cry to heaven.
Page 778 - When, therefore, in this House we give and grant, we give and grant what is our own. But in an American tax, what do we do? We, Your Majesty's Commons of Great Britain, give and grant to Your Majesty, what? Our own property? No. We give and grant to Your Majesty, the property of Your Majesty's Commons of America. It is an absur-dity in terms.
Page 440 - I am very sorry to know and hear how unreverently that most precious jewel, the word of God, is disputed, rhymed, sung, and jangled in every alehouse and tavern, contrary to the true meaning and doctrine of the same.
Page 580 - That it is fit that his lordship do endeavour with his majesty's forces to wound, kill, slay, and destroy, by all the ways and means he may, all the said rebels, and their adherents and relievers ; and burn, spoil, waste, consume, destroy, and demolish, all the places, towns, and houses, where the said rebels are, or have been, relieved and harboured, and all the hay and corn there ; and kill and destroy all the men there inhabiting able to bear arms.'!!.

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