Foliorum centuriae, selections for translation into Latin and Greek prose, by H.A. Holden

Front Cover
Hubert Ashton Holden
1864
 

Contents

60
39
Letter
45
80
51
The Saxons and Angles
54
Letter
57
Democratical governments
62
Philosophy its work
63
Analogy in the transmission of government
68
110
69
116
72
E Gibbon
73
English colonial policy
74
Epitaphs
78
Comedyprogress of bad taste
80
The force of custom in regard to a future life
86
Latter days of Oliver Cromwell
92
Sylla apparent inconsistency in his character
98
Visit to the site of the mansion of Cornelia
106
179
111
Intellect of Adam in Paradise
117
200
123
Description of an earthquake D De
124
Story of Canute J Milton
125
Taking of Pontefract Castle Lord Clarendon
126
Wellingtons address to the inhabitants of Oporto
127
Of mans free will
128
2089
129
Gradual change in mans estimate of pleasure
130
Independence of spirit
131
Moral of the story of Achilles and Chiron N Machiavelli
132
Duty of prosecutors E Burke
133
Youth
134
Profligacy of politicians in the reign of Charles II
135
Surrender of the Carthaginians to the Roman army Sir W Ralegh
136
Judgments of wise men R Hooker
137
Interference of learning with business Lord Bacon
138
Beesa pattern of good government F Holland
139
Comparison between Agathocles and Richard III Sir W Ralegh
140
London after the battle of the Boyne
141
A dialogue G Berkeley
142
Mary Queen of Scotsher departure from France W Robertson
143
Employment variable A Smith
144
Liberty to be given only to those who are worthy of
145
Eumenes Sir W Ralegh
146
Popularity not to be sought nor despised
147
The elementstheir uses G Wilson
148
Actions influenced by notions G Berkeley
149
Independent existence G Berkeley
150
Religion not to be taken on trust 7 Boswell
151
Wealth alone will not cause a flourishing kingdom G Berkeley
152
Fortune mistaken notions concerning
153
Reasoning mans most appropriate occupation
154
Difference of opinions does not imply uncertainty G Berkeley
155
Nature gives way to custom alone Lord Bacon
156
Envy of virtue generally in the vicious Lord Bacon
157
Opinion 7 Selden
158
Prejudice in favour of antiquity S Johnson
159
Queen Elizabeth and Mary Queen of Scots
160
Revenge and gratitude
161
Story of a dolphin Sir R Barckley
162
Guilt is never wise T Erskine
163
Democracy favourable to virtue Sir W Blackstone
164
Eros and Anteros J Milton
165
Atheiststheir foolish credulity concerning atoms
166
Lisbon under the government of Junot R Southey
167
Asem the manhater and the genius O Goldsmith
168
Authority R Hooker
169
The republic of Venice W Robertson
170
Insensibility to the planetary system P B Shelley
171
Operations before the battle of Floddenfield
172
Darius Hystaspeshis narrow escape out of Scythia Sir W Ralegh
173
A perfect democracy E Burke
174
F Cortes
175
Renunciation of freedom J Milton
176
12
177
Job iv 1317 E Burke
178
An Africans speech
179
Solon and Peisistratus W S Landor
180
Actions apart from moral considerations
181
Law against the admission of strangers
182
Aristophanes R Porson
183
Factions Lord Bacon
184
208
185
Learning may pay homage to wealth Lord Bacon
186
Peccant humours of learning Lord Bacon
187
S Johnson
188
Inquiry into the souls nature Lord Bacon
189
The true source of poetry Sir W Temple
190
Knowledge increases power
191
Of moral discipline 7 Butler
192
13
193
Liberty of writing at Athens 7 Milton
194
Platohis exclusionof poetry 7 Milton
195
T Arnold
196
The dangers of an honest man in much company A Cowley
197
History 7 Dryden
198
Conformity to the divine nature R Hooker
199
True greatness of mind Spectator
200
The perceptions of sense G Berkeley
201
A Pope
202
Addison
203
Richard III D Hume
204
Perkin Warbeckhis design on Kent Lord Bacon
205
Brutus speech upon the murder of Csar W Shakespeare
206
The Spanish character W F P Napier
207
338
208
R Bentley
209
Superiority of intellectual pleasures over all other Lord Bacon
210
God the only punisher of secret actions
211
E Gibbon
212
Gods particular providence
213
The virtue of moderation
214
Insensibility to the beauties of nature Tatler
215
Happiness of action
216
Modern want of sincerity in conversation
217
Concealment of King Charles at Boscobel A D 1651 D Hume
218
Expenditure Lord Bacon
219
Regicide empire E Burke
220
Beauty G Berkeley
221
W Paley
222
The higher classestheir contribution to the de mands of war E Burke
223
Liberty of unlicensed printing J Milton
224
15
225
League between avarice and luxury
226
Misconduct of the ministry in respect to the Carnatic E Burke
227
Passionstheir effectual control
228
The outpensioners of Chelsea College A D 1739 G Anson
229
R South
230
Consolation in exile Lord Bolingbroke
231
Of names universal 7 Hobbes
241
Platos doctrines T Gray
242
The true patriot
243
Massacre during the French Revolution
244
Lucian on the writing of history T Gray
245
Search after truth
246
Mercenary informers E Burke
247
The moral virtuesthe attributes of God W
248
E Gibbon
249
Invasion F Quarles
250
Disadvantages of an exalted reputation
251
England compared to a ship of war G Canning
252
Kings debarred from the privilege of foreign travel
253
Reliques of goodness extant in the soul of man I Barrow
254
Proper objects of industry D Hume
255
Of benefits R Steele
256
419
257
Timeserving statesmen J Milton
258
R Southey
259
The punishment of the voluptuous
261
The Sienese and Charles V and Cosmo De Medici
263
Deathbed scene
267
J Milton
268
436
269
J Ruskin
273
The retreat from Moscow
275
Rinaldos oration to the Duke of Milan
279
A Cowley
280
Qualification of women for rule
281
455
282
Love of truth
285
464
288
Kings have little to desire
294
Hume
295
B Franklin
297
A Froude
299
The Norman Conquest
300
Neris answer to Count Poppis address
303
E Gibbon
306
Story of Callisthenes and Alexander
308
The King and Bishop
314
W Paley
317
A Roman funeral
321
G Burnet
324
The hope of the righteous
330
T Burnet
333
Want of combined action
336
Of Submission to Gods will
337
Lord Bacon
338
Hume
339
The Besieged
342
22
343
W Robertson
346
Spectator
348
Queen Elizabeths speech in the camp of Tilbury D Hume
349
Pompey the Greathis miserable death
352
A Pope
354
47
355
Junius
357
Character of Sir Robert Walpole
360
S T Coleridge
364
History
366
Wellingtons attack at Salamanca A D 1812
369
The battle of Edgehill A D 1642
372
Lord Clarendon
375
The true poet
376
Nicias
378
Letter to his Mother on the loss of his Aunt
381
The Indian and bear
384
J Milton
387
Despotism not the duty of an English Colonial
390
Fitness to govern Lord Bacon
391
The law of Solon Plutarch
392
Preface to the History of the Rebellion
393
W Robertson
394
Speech of a plebeian N Machiavelli
395
Greek Religion Max Mller
396
King 7 Selden
397
Hume
402
Lord Macaulay
404
J Selden
413
W Robertson
419
Sir W Ralegh
421
J Ruskin
422
Butler
431
A Cowley
435
Addison
436
Conyers Middleton
447
E Burke
449
Lord Clarendon
467
Sir W Temple
468
T Arnold
475
G Wilson
476
Sir W Ralegh
477
Spectator
479
J Milton
484
A Pope
486
E Burke
488
Barrow
489
N Machiavelli
491
Lord Clarendon
496
R Hooker
497
Lord Bacon
499
Hume
503
321
504
Thirlwall
507
Lord Chesterfield
510
H W Longfellow
512
T Burnet
515
E Burke
517
Hume
518
Lord Bacon
523
E Burke
524
Cromwell Lord Clarendon
525
The art of government J Milton
526
Heraclitus
527
Ignorance of lifes great business T Arnold
528
W Mitford
529
Truth and error
530
The lower animals without fellowfeeling
531
Letter
532
533 The Emperor Julian E Gibbon
533
Intercourse with the great men of old Lord Macaulay
534
Fortune B Jonson
535
Sir R Steele
536
The disease of talking B Jonson
537
S Knight
538
Memory B Jonson
539

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 439 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause; and be silent that you may hear: believe me for mine honour; and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom; and awake your senses that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Ca;sar was no less than his.
Page 40 - Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend.
Page 67 - But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or furthest end of knowledge. For men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity and inquisitive appetite; sometimes to entertain their minds with variety and delight; sometimes for ornament and reputation; and sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction; and most times for lucre and profession; and seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of...
Page 360 - Neither the perseverance of Holland, nor the activity of France, nor the dexterous and firm sagacity of English enterprise, ever carried this most perilous mode of hardy industry to the extent to which it has been pushed by this recent people ; a people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.
Page 86 - The heavens declare the glory of God: and the firmament sheweth his handywork. Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night sheweth knowledge. There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard.
Page 103 - I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.
Page 273 - Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the truest wisdom; and a great empire and little minds go ill together.
Page 243 - Now therein of all sciences — I speak still of human, and according to the human conceit — is our poet the monarch. For he doth not only show the way, but giveth so sweet a prospect into the way as will entice any man to enter into it.
Page 439 - Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.

Bibliographic information